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Academics

This is a list of members of the Faculty and others involved in teaching and/or research, including those who work in our associated research centres, or are based in colleges or, in a few cases, in other departments or faculties.


Lists of Academics: Holders of Law Faculty Posts | College Staff | Centre and other Research Staff | Members of Other Departments | Visiting Professors | All

Other lists: Other members of the Faculty | Retired members of the Faculty | All current members of the Faculty | Who teaches what


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photo of Thomas Adams

Thomas Adams
Stipendiary Lecturer in Law

Balliol College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law

Research interests: Legal Philosophy, Public Law

Thomas Adams is Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Balliol College, Oxford. He teaches Administrative Law and Constitutional Law as well as being the college's acting senior law tutor.

Tom completed the BA in Jurisprudence and BCL at St Peter’s College, Oxford, following which he was a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at St Hilda’s College (2009-2012). More recently Tom has been a visiting researcher at New York University (2012-2013).



photo of Dapo Akande

Dapo Akande
Professor of Public International Law

St Peter's College

Teaches: Public International Law, Contract

Research interests: Public International Law

Dapo Akande is also Yamani Fellow at St. Peter's College and Co-Director of the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict (ELAC) & the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations. He has held visiting professorships at Yale Law School (where he was also Robinna Foundation International Fellow), the University of Miami School of Law and the Catolica Global Law School, Lisbon. Before taking up his position in Oxford in 2004, he was Lecturer in Law at the University of Nottingham School of Law (1998-2000) and at the University of Durham (2000-2004). From 1994 to 1998, he taught international law (part-time) at the London School of Economics and at Christ's College and Wolfson College, University of Cambridge.

He has varied research interests within the field of general international law and has published articles on aspects of the law of international organizations, international dispute settlement, international criminal law and the law of armed conflict. His articles have been published in leading international law journals such as the American Journal of International Law, the British Yearbook of International Law and the European Journal of International Law . His article in the Journal of International Criminal Justice on the "Jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court over Nationals of Non-Parties: Legal Basis and Limits" was awarded the 2003 Giorgio La Pira Prize.

Dapo has advised States, international organizations and non-governmental organizations on matters of international law. He has worked with the United Nations on issues relating to international humanitarian law and human rights law; acted as consultant for the African Union on the international criminal court and on the law relating to terrorism; and also as a consultant for the Commonwealth Secretariat on the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has also provided training on international law to diplomats, military officers and other government officials. He has advised and assisted counsel, or provided expert opinions, in cases before the International Court of Justice, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, international arbitral tribunals, WTO and NAFTA Dispute Settlement Panels as well as cases in England and the United States of America.

In addition to being founding editor of EJIL:Talk! (the widely read blog of the European Journal of International Law), he is (or has been) a member of the boards of a number of journals, academic and professional organizations. These include membership of the Editorial Boards of the American Journal of International Law; the European Journal of International Law; the African Journal of International and Comparative Law; of the Advisory Council of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law; the Executive Council of the British Branch of the International Law Association; the Advisory Board of the International Centre for Transitional Justice; the Advisory Committee of International Lawyers for Africa; and the Advisory Board of International Law Studies. He is also a member of the International Advisory Panel for the American Law Institute’s project on the Restatement Fourth, The Foreign Relations Law of the United States.



photo of John Armour

John Armour
Hogan Lovells Professor of Law and Finance

Oriel College

Teaches: Corporate Insolvency Law, Corporate Finance, Comparative and European Corporate Law, Company Law, Law and Finance, Principles of Financial Regulation

John Armour was appointed to the Hogan Lovells Professorship of Law and Finance, in association with Oriel College on 1 July 2007, having previously been a University Senior Lecturer in Law and Fellow of Trinity Hall at Cambridge University. He studied law (MA, BCL) at the University of Oxford before completing his LLM at Yale Law School and taking up his first post at the University of Nottingham. He has held visiting posts at various institutions including the University of Bologna, Columbia Law School, the University of Frankfurt, the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Private Law, Hamburg, the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the University of Western Ontario.

He has published widely in the fields of company law, corporate finance, and corporate insolvency. His main research interest lies in the integration of legal and economic analysis, with particular emphasis on the impact on the real economy of changes in the law governing company law, corporate insolvency and financial regulation. He has been involved in policy related projects commissioned by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Financial Services Authority, the Insolvency Service, and the Jersey Economic Development Department.



photo of Dan Awrey

Dan Awrey
Associate Professor of Law and Finance

Linacre College

Teaches: Law and Finance, Principles of Financial Regulation

Dan Awrey is an Associate Professor of Law and Finance and Academic Director of the MSc in Law and Finance programme.  Before entering academia, Dan served as legal counsel to a global investment management firm and, prior to that, as an associate practicing corporate finance and securities law with a major Canadian law firm.

Dan's teaching and research interests reside in the area of financial regulation and, more specifically, the regulation of banks, non-bank financial intermediaries, collective investment schemes, derivatives markets, and financial market infrastructure.

Dan holds degrees from Queen's University (B.A., LL.B.), the University of Toronto (LL.M.) and Oxford University (D.Phil.). 

 



photo of Roderick Bagshaw

Roderick Bagshaw
Associate Professor of Law

Magdalen College

Teaches: Civil Procedure, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Evidence, Tort

Research interests: Tort, Administrative Law, Private Law and Fundamental Rights, Evidence

Roderick Bagshaw is Tutor and Fellow in Law at Magdalen College and an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law. He teaches undergraduate courses in Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Tort Law, and on the postgraduate BCL Evidence and Private Law and Fundamental Rights courses. He was formerly on the Executive Committee of the Society of Legal Scholars and the Convenor of the Society's Tort Law Subject Section.

Previous posts:

Fellow of Mansfield College 1994-2002.

Lecturer, Jesus College, 1992-94.



photo of Nicholas Bamforth

Nicholas Bamforth
CUF in Law

A CUF (Common University Fund) Lecturership is a tenured (or tenure-track) position, held by a Fellow of a College on whom the University has conferred a Lecturership. CUF Lecturers engage in research and teach for their College and the University, and carry out more College teaching than tutors who are University Lecturers.

The Queen's College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, Jurisprudence, Human Rights, Sexuality and Law

Nicholas Bamforth, BCL. MA (Oxon) is a Fellow in Law at The Queen's College, Oxford. He was an elected member of Oxford's University Council from October 2006 to March 2010, and an ex officio member - while serving as the University Junior Proctor - from 2010 to 2011. He has twice been a visiting Hauser Global Research Fellow at New York University. 



photo of Nicholas Barber

Nicholas Barber
Associate Professor of Constitutional Law

Trinity College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Public Law, Constitutional Law, Constitutional Theory, Administrative Law.

 

Nick Barber joined the Oxford Law Faculty in 1998 as a Fixed Term Fellow at Brasenose, moving to a tenured Fellowship at Trinity College in 2000.  He holds an MA from Oxford and the BCL, and is a non-practicing barrister and member of Middle Temple.  In 2013 he was appointed University Lecturer in Constitutional Law.  In 2012 and 2013 he was a visiting Professor at Renmin University, China.  He has lectured extensively on constitutional law and theory in many countries.  He has published many papers in these areas, and his book - The Constitutional State – was published in 2011, and has been widely reviewed.  He is also editor of the United Kingdom Constitutional Law Blog and a vice-president of the United Kingdom Constitutional Law Association.  



photo of Hugh Beale

Hugh Beale
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Commercial Law

Hugh Beale has been the Commercial Law and Common Law Commissioner at the Law Commission since 2000. While he has been at the Commission, reports in his area of responsibility have included Limitation of Actions, Unfair Terms in Contracts and Company Security Interests. He is also a Professor of Law at the University of Warwick, where he has taught since 1987.



photo of Iris Benöhr

Iris Benöhr
British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Teaches: European Union Law

Research interests: EU law, consumer law, comparative law, contract law, constitutional law, human rights, socio-legal studies, dispute resolution and environmental law.

Iris Benöhr is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies and holds a PhD and Master in law (European University Institute, Florence) and a Licence en Droit (University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland /Erasmus year at the University of Salamanca, Spain). She was admitted to the Bar, Zurich (Switzerland). Prior to the fellowship, she held positions as a qualified lawyer, at an international law firm, at the United Nations and at the European Commission.

Her main research interests lie in the fields of EU law, consumer law, comparative law, contract law, constitutional law, human rights, socio-legal studies, dispute resolution and environmental law.

Working languages: English, German, French, Italian, Spanish



photo of Frank Berman

Sir Frank Berman
Visiting Professor in International Law

Wadham College

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: International Law

Frank Berman QC joined the Faculty in 2000 as Visiting Professor in International Law on his retirement from the post of Legal Adviser to the Foreign & Commonwealth Office.

During a full career in the Diplomatic Service, he served in Berlin, Bonn and at the UN in New York, conducted cases before the International Court of Justice and arbitral tribunals and took part in numerous international negotiations, culminating in leading the British Delegation to the International Conference that drew up the Statute of the International Criminal Court.

He came to Oxford to read law as a Rhodes Scholar and is an Hon. Fellow (now Fellow) of Wadham. He practises at the Bar in public international law and international arbitration. He is a member of numerous committees in the legal field, including the Advisory Councils of the Institute for European & Comparative Law and of the Oxford University Law Foundation, and is a member of the Editorial Board of the British Year Book of International Law.

His research interests lie principally in the law of treaties, the use of force, settlement of disputes, international humanitarian law and the law of international organizations. He is preparing a Second Edition of Lord McNair's classic work on The Law of Treaties, and chairs the International Law Association's Committee on the Accountability of International Organizations. He serves on the Staff Tribunal of the International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund and has been appointed Chairman of the Austrian National Committee to supervise the compensation of victims of Nazi persecution.



photo of Ulf Bernitz

Ulf Bernitz
Co-ordinator for the Wallenberg Foundation Oxford/Stockholm Association in European Law

Balliol College & Institute of European and Comparative Law & Centre for Competition Law & Policy


Ulf Bernitz is a regular visitor to the IECL. He is also course director of the Master of European Law course at Stockholm University and director of the Stockhom Institute of European Law.



photo of Ruth Bird

Ruth Bird
Bodleian Law Librarian

Bodleian Law Library

Research interests: Legal Information Literacy; Legal Research; Knowledge Management; Academic Libraries

Ruth Bird's career started in secondary school teaching before undertaking postgraduate studies in Librarianship, and working for several years as a teacher librarian.

In 1988 she moved into law libraries as the Manager of Information Services at Arthur Robinson & Hedderwicks, a leading Australian law firm. In 1994 she became their Practice Development Manager, responsible for marketing services in the firm, which is now part of Allens Arthur Robinson.

In 1993, as the National Convener of the Australian Law Librarians Group, she worked with colleagues in all state divisions to improve professional development for Australian law librarians.

In 1996 she moved to academia, joining the University of Melbourne Library, and Law Faculty, as the Law Librarian. During this time she worked closely with the Faculty in the planning of the Legal Resource Centre in the new Law School Building.

In 2000 she became the Firm Legal Information Manager, responsible for precedents and libraries across all the offices of Australian law firm Phillips Fox.

In 2004 Ruth (with her husband, Ian), relocated to Oxford, where she became the Bodleian Law Librarian at the University of Oxford. Numerous projects have been undertaken in the law library, including a reclassification of the text collection, the creation of a new reading room for graduates, and an increased concentration on research courses for postgraduate students.

Ruth was a member of the Council of BIALL (British and Irish Association of Law Librarians) 2008 - 2011, and is a member of the Board of the International Association of Law Libraries. In 2008 she undertook an academic exchange at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and Private International Law in Hamburg, researching the role of print materials in libraries in a digital age. In 2010 she researched legal information literacy during an academic exchange at the University of Melbourne Law School.

In 2010, Ruth was made an Honorary Bencher at Middle Temple.



photo of Eirik Bjorge

Eirik Bjorge
Shaw Foundation Junior Research Fellow

Jesus College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Public International Law

Research interests: My research interests include public law, at domestic, European, and international level.

Eirik Bjorge, LLB (Oslo), MJur, DPhil, is the Shaw Foundation Junior Research Fellow at Jesus College. Eirik has, among other things, been pensionnaire étranger at École normale supérieure, visiting researcher at Sciences Po and the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, and stagiaire at the Conseil d’État and the European Court of Human Rights. He has taught at Oxford and at Sciences Po.



photo of Alan Bogg

Alan Bogg
Professor of Labour Law

Hertford College

Teaches: Labour/Employment Law, Criminal Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Labour Law, Criminal Law

Alan received his undergraduate and graduate education in Oxford, being awarded his BA in Law (first class) in 1997. Thereafter, he was awarded the degrees of BCL (first class) and DPhil. Following a period as a lecturer at the University of Birmingham, Alan returned to Oxford in 2003 to take up his fellowship at Hertford College. Alan's research focuses predominantly on theoretical issues in domestic, European and International labour law. His book 'The Democratic Aspects of Trade Union Recognition' was published in 2009 by Hart Publishing. It was awarded the SLS Peter Birks' Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship in 2010. The book has been reviewed in the Cambridge Law Journal, Law Quarterly Review, Modern Law Review, Industrial Law Journal, British Journal of Industrial Relations, International Journal of Law in Context, Industrial Relations Journal (UK), Journal of Industrial Relations (Australia), Osgoode Hall Law Journal, and Canadian Journal of Employment and Labour Law. Additionally, his work in labour law has been published in a wide variety of international journals.

He is currently coordinating a Leverhulme International Research Network with Professor Tonia Novitz at the University of Bristol following the successful award of a large scale grant. Details of the network's activities can be found here: www.voicesatwork.org.uk. The network includes academics from Stanford, Osgoode Hall, and Monash Universities.

Additionally, current research projects include: the intersection between migrant status and labour rights; European Social Dialogue and theories of deliberative democracy; and the constitutionalisation of freedom of association in comparative perspective. His work has been cited by Advocate Generals in the Court of Justice of the European Union in respect of working time regulation. Most recently, his work was cited with approval by the United Kingdom Supreme Court on the issue of sham contracts of employment in Autoclenz v Belcher. He is a member of the Executive Committee of the Institute of Employment Rights.



photo of Mary Bosworth

Mary Bosworth
Professor of Criminology

St Cross College & Centre for Criminology

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminology

Research interests: Gender, punishment, citizenship, race, prisons, immigration detention

Mary Bosworth is Professor of Criminology and Fellow of St Cross College at the University of Oxford and, concurrently, Professor of Criminology at Monash University, Australia. She is Assistant Director of the Centre for Criminology and Director of Border Criminologies, an interdisciplinary research group focusing on the intersections between criminal justice and border control.  Dr Bosworth conducts research into the ways in which prisons and immigration detention centres uphold notions of race, gender and citizenship and how those who are confined negotiate their daily lives. Her research is international and comparative and has included work conducted in Paris, Britain, the USA and Australia.  Dr Bosworth is currently heading a five-year project on “Subjectivity, Identity and Penal Power: Incarceration in a Global Age” funded by a Starting Grant from the European Research Council as well as a Leverhulme International Network on External Border Control. Details of both of these projects can be found at the website http://bordercriminologies.law.ox.ac.uk. Mary is the UK Editor-in-Chief of Theoretical Criminology, a co-editor of Routledge Studies in Criminal Justice, Borders and Citizenship, and a member of the editorial boards of the British Journal of Criminology, Race & Justice, the International Journal of Border Security and Immigration Policy and Clarendon Studies in Criminology at Oxford University Press.



photo of Ben Bradford

Ben Bradford
Departmental Lecturer in Criminology

Centre for Criminology

Research interests: Trust and confidence in the police and criminal justice system; procedural justice; organizational justice; legitimacy; cross-national comparisons.

Ben's research focuses primarily on issues of trust and legitimacy as these apply to the police and the wider criminal justice system. International and cross-national comparisons of these issues are a growing research interest, and his work has a particular emphasis on procedural justice theory and the intersection of social-psychological and sociological explanatory paradigms. He has collaborated with the London Metropolitan Police, the College of Policing and other agencies on research projects concerned with improving police understanding of public opinions and priorities.



photo of Paul Brand

Paul Brand
Professor of English Legal History

All Souls College

Teaches: Legal History

Research interests: Legal History



photo of Alexandra Braun

Alexandra Braun
Associate Professor of Law

Lady Margaret Hall

Teaches: Contract, Roman Law, Trusts, Land Law, Advanced Property and Trusts, Comparative Private Law

Research interests: Comparative Trusts and Succession Law, European Private Law, European Legal History and Comparative Law

Alexandra Braun is a Fellow and Tutor in Law at Lady Margaret Hall and a Research Fellow at the Institute of European and Comparative Law. Prior to that she was a Supernumerary Teaching Fellow and a Junior Research Fellow in Law at St. John's College, Oxford. She received her BA and LLM degree from the University of Genoa (Italy) and holds a PhD in Comparative Private Law from the University of Trento (Italy). Since 2009 she is also a Visiting Associate Professor at the International University College of Turin where she teaches a course on Intergenerational Transfer of Wealth.

Her teaching interests include Comparative Private Law and Legal History as well as some core areas of private law such as Trust Law, Succession Law and Contract Law. Currently, she teaches the undergraduate courses on A Roman Introduction to Private Law, Trust Law and Land Law and the BCL/MJur course on Advanced Property and Trusts.

Her main research interests lie in the field of Comparative Law, European Private Law and Legal History, as well as areas of private law such as Contract Law, Succession Law and the Law of Trusts.



photo of Adrian Briggs

Adrian Briggs
Professor of Private International Law

St Edmund Hall

Teaches: Conflict of Laws, Contract, Land Law

Research interests: Conflict of Laws (especially jurisdiction and foreign judgements)

Adrian Briggs is the Sir Richard Gozney Fellow and Tutor at St Edmund Hall. He has been teaching in Oxford since 1980. His main interest is in private international law, and within that, in questions of civil jurisdiction and the effect of foreign judgments. He spent 15 years as an assistant editor of Dicey, Morris and Collins, The Conflict of Laws, but his own perspective on the subject is to be published under the title 'Private International Law in English Courts' in October 2014, when it will take its place alongside his several other books on private international law. He practises from chambers in the Temple, from which he is able to remind himself (and to be reminded by others) that although it is one thing to persuade oneself that the law is clear and rational, it is quite another to persuade a court that one is right.



photo of Susan Bright

Susan Bright
Professor of Land Law, McGregor Fellow

New College

Teaches: Contract, Land Law, Regulation

Research interests: Landlord and Tenant, Housing, Green Leases, Research Methods

Sue teaches land law, contract law, regulation, and housing and human rights. She has been teaching at Oxford University since 1992, after a period as a solicitor in London and teaching at Essex University.

Her research spans doctrinal law, socio-legal, empirical methods and inter-disciplinary work and is mainly in the area of property law, with a focus on issues relating to commercial property and housing.

Sue is currently working in three main areas. The first relates to housing possession. In April 2014 she published a report on her research with Dr Lisa Whitehouse, Hull University. This report examines case management and the legal process of possession including the amount of advice and support available to defendants at court premises and draws on surveys and interviews. Information about this work, and the report, is available at: http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/projects/Housing_Possession. Following on from this work she is exploring the process of decision-making in possession cases, drawing on law, psychology and the behavioural sciences.

Sue also works in the area of environmental performance and the commercial built environment, particularly examining the development and role of ‘green leases’. Her published research discusses the opportunities and challenges for the environmental improvement of the performance of the tenanted commercial built environment with a particular focus on the impact of the Carbon Reduction Commitment, and of green leases. She has co-authored work that brings together both the physical and the social sciences of energy use in buildings so that technological solutions are made effective by an understanding of the way that buildings are used and communities behave. She is part of a research team that has been awarded money from EPSRC on a project called: Wicked, that examines Energy Management in the Retail Sector. Further details about this project are available at: http://www.energy.ox.ac.uk/wicked/

The eclectic nature of her research approaches has led Sue to think about how legal scholars conduct research. She is currently guest-editing (with Professor Sarah Blandy) a special issue of the Property Law Review that explores different research methods in property law.  A summary of findings from a survey of property law academics that feeds into this project can be found at: http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/documents/PR_Survey_report.pdf

A selection of Sue's papers can be accessed on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) at: http://ssrn.com/author=529157.

Sue is also a fee-paid Judge of the First Tier Tribunal (Property Chamber), a Fellow of the South African Research Chair in Property Law, a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the University of New South Wales and an academic member of the Chancery Bar Association.



photo of Andrew Burrows

Andrew Burrows
Professor of the Law of England

All Souls College

Teaches: Commercial Law, Contract, Restitution, Tort

Research interests: English Private Law, Contract, Unjust Enrichment, Tort, Remedies

Andrew Burrows, MA, BCL, LLM (Harvard), QC (Hon), FBA, Barrister and Honorary Bencher of Middle Temple is is Professor of the Law of England and a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls. Formerly: the Norton Rose Professor of Commercial Law, Fellow of St. Hugh's College. Honorary Director of the Oxford University Law Foundation.

 

Law Commissioner for England and Wales 1994-1999; Professor of English Law, University College, London 1994-1999; Fellow and CUF Lecturer in Law, Lady Margaret Hall, 1986-1994; Lecturer in Law, University of Manchester 1980-1986; Visiting Professor, Bond University 1994; Research Fellow, Australian National University 1994.

Judicial Studies Board; Civil Committee of the Judicial Studies Board; Recorder on the South-Eastern Circuit; Member of the Ogden Working Party; Door Tenant of Fountain Court Chambers, London.



photo of Laura Carlson

Laura Carlson
Stockholm Research Fellow

Institute of European and Comparative Law

Research interests: Comparative law, EU law, employment law, labour law, equality law

Laura is an Associate Professor at the Department of Law, Stockholm University, enjoying a research fellowship in law at Christ Church College during the academic year 2014/2015. At Stockholm Laura is the head of labour law, with responsibility for both undergraduate as well as masters level courses in labour and employment law, equality law and American & English Business Law.

Laura’s academic background includes: B.A. History, Carleton College, USA, Juris Doctor, College of Law, University of Minnesota, USA, Master of Laws (jur.kand.), Uppsala University, Sweden, Juris Doktor, Department of Law, Stockholm University, Sweden, and Stockholm Centre Oxford Fellow for 2014-15.

Her publications include: Laura Carlson, The Fundamentals of Swedish Law (2012, 2nd ed.), Laura Carlson, Swedish Real Property Law (2008), Ronnie Eklund, Tore Sigeman and Laura Carlson, Swedish Labour and Employment Law: Cases and Materials ( 2008), Laura Carlson, Searching for Equality: Sex Discrimination, Parental Leave and the Swedish Model with Comparisons to EU, UK and US Law (2007) and Laura Carlson, American Business Law, A Civil Law Perspective (2004). She has also written several articles in the areas of equality law, labour union law, academic freedom and comparative law.



photo of John Cartwright

John Cartwright
Professor of the Law of Contract

Christ Church

Teaches: Comparative Private Law, Contract, Land Law, Roman Law, Tort

Research interests: Contract, Tort, Property Law, Comparative Law

John Cartwright has been Official Student (Fellow and Tutor) in Law at Christ Church since 1982, and Professor of the Law of Contract in the University since 2008. (He was Lecturer in Law from 1982 until 2004, then Reader in the Law of Contract from 2004 to 2008.) He is also a Solicitor. In 2007 he was appointed as Professor of Anglo-American Private Law at the University of Leiden and for a number of years he has been professeur invité at the University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas). His research interests are in the fields of English and comparative private law, especially contract and land law. He teaches the undergraduate courses on Contract, Comparative Law (English/French Law of Contract), Land Law, Tort and Roman Law, and the BCL/MJur course on European Private Law (Contract).



photo of Mindy Chen-Wishart

Mindy Chen-Wishart
Reader in Contract Law

Merton College

Teaches: Contract, Philosophy of Law, Restitution

Research interests: Contract, Restitution, Contract theory, Comparative Law

Mindy Chen-Wishart is a Reader of Contract Law at Oxford University and a Tutorial Fellow in Law at Merton College. She has taught law since 1985. Until 1992, she was a Senior Lecturer at Otago University in New Zealand. She twas previously a Rhodes Visiting Research Fellow at St. Hilda's College before taking up her current position. She has taught Contract, Restitution, Torts and Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, Consumer Protection Law and Introduction to Law. She is involved in graduate teaching in Philosophical Foundations of the Common Law and supervises graduate students working in Contract, Contract Theory and Restitution.

She is author of Contract Law (4th ed), and is leading a large project on the Contract Laws of Asia, to be published with OUP.  She holds visiting professorships at Hong Kong University and the National University of Singapore. She delivered the Fourth Annual International and Comparative Quarterly Lecture as author of the best paper in 2013. 

 



photo of Hugh Collins

Hugh Collins
Vinerian Professor

Oxford Law Faculty & All Souls College

Teaches: Commercial Law, Comparative Private Law, Contract, European Business Regulation, European Union Law, Human Rights Law, Labour/Employment Law, Philosophy of Law, Private Law and Fundamental Rights

Hugh Collins became the Vinerian Professor of English Law in 2013. He obtained his BA (1974) and BCL (1975) from Pembroke College, Oxford, and an LLM (1986) from Harvard Law School. He was a Fellow in law at Brasenose College, Oxford from 1976 to 1990, when he became the Professor of English Law at the London School of Economics, where he was also head of the department of law for two terms of office. He has been a Visiting Professor at New York University Law School and Boston University Law School. He has served as a member of the editorial committee of The Modern Law Review since 1991, and as a founder and editor of the European Review of Contract Law. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2006.



photo of Rachel Condry

Rachel Condry
Associate Professor of Criminology

Centre for Criminology

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminology

Research interests: Family violence, the families of offenders and victims, the family in youth justice, secondary victimization, narrative accounts and neutralizations, vicarious shame and stigma, the state regulation of parenting and family life.

Rachel Condry joined the Law Faculty in 2010. She is an Associate Professor at the Centre for Criminology and a Fellow of St Hilda's College. She has previously been a lecturer in criminology at the University of Surrey, and a lecturer and British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the London School of Economics. She is currently writing a book on adolescent to parent violence having recently completed a three year ESRC-funded project.



photo of Cathryn Costello

Cathryn Costello
Andrew W. Mellon University Lectureship in International Human Rights and Refugee Law

St Antony's College

Teaches: European Union Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Labour/Employment Law, Human Rights Law

Cathryn Costello is Andrew W. Mellon University Lectureship in International Human Rights and Refugee Law, at the Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford, with a fellowship at St Antony's College. From 2003-2013, she was Francis Reynolds Fellow & Tutor in EU & Public law at Worcester College, Oxford, during which time she also completed her DPhil studies on EU asylum and immigration law.  She has taught a range of public and EU law courses on the Oxford undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum.  She began her academic career in 1998 as Lecturer in European Law at the Law School, Trinity College Dublin, and from 2000-2003, she also held the position of Director of the Irish Centre for European Law.   She has been a Visiting Professor at the University of San Francisco and a visiting research fellow at NYU School of Law.  

Cathryn has published widely on many aspects of EU and human rights law, including asylum and refugee law, immigration, EU Citizenship and third country national family members, family reunification and immigration detention.  Her current research includes a monograph on EU immigration and asylum law due to be published in OUP’s Studies in European Law series, and an edited collection (with Professor Mark Freedland, St John's College) from the Migrants at Work Project, exploring intersections between immigration law and labour law.

She is also an Associate Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub, which aims to bring together academics, practitioners, and policy-makers from across the globe to advance the understanding and protection of human rights and equality.  



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Paul Cowie
Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at St Hilda's College

St Hilda's College

Teaches: Philosophy of Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law

Research interests: Moral & Political Philosophy, Jurisprudence

Paul Linton Cowie is a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at St Hilda's College, Oxford.

He studied Law with European Law at Lincoln College, Oxford and Leiden University. He then studied philosophy and economics at a postgraduate level at both New York University and Harvard, and has been a visiting research student at both the Centre for History and Economics, Cambridge and the Northern Institute of Philosophy, Aberdeen. He returned to Oxford in 2010 to conduct a doctorate in legal philosophy.

His research focuses on the theoretical relationship between legal philosophy (primarily human rights) and economic philosophy (primarily welfare economics). He has also worked in moral philosophy on the relation between reasons, rationality and morality.

He teaches Constitutional Law, Administrative Law and Jurisprudence for St Hilda?s College. He also teaches Moral and Political Philosophy for the Law Faculty.



photo of Paul Craig

Paul Craig
Professor of English Law

St John's College & Centre for Competition Law & Policy

Teaches: Comparative Public Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Human Rights Law, Regulation

Research interests: Tort; Administrative Law, Constitutional Law, European Community Law

Paul Craig, MA 1973, BCL 1974, Oxon, Gibbs Prize 1972, Henriques Prize 1973, Vinerian Scholar 1974. Professor in English Law since Oct 1998- St. John's College .

Formerly: Professor in Law 1996-1998 Worcester College; Lecturer, Magdalen College, 1974-75, Reader 1991-96.



photo of Anne Davies

Anne Davies
Professor of Law and Public Policy

Brasenose College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Labour/Employment Law, Regulation, European Union Law, Medical Law and Ethics

Research interests: Public Law, Labour Law

Anne Davies is Fellow and Tutor in Law at Brasenose College. She was awarded the title of Reader in Public Law in 2006, and the title of Professor of Law and Public Policy in 2010. She studied at Oxford, completing the BA (winning the Gibbs and Martin Wronker Prizes) and the D.Phil. She was a Prize Fellow at All Souls College from 1995 to 2001, and a Visiting Scholar at the University of Michigan in 1999. Professor Davies is the author of four books and numerous articles in the fields of public law and labour law.

In public law, she has a particular interest in government contracts. Her D.Phil. thesis examined the phenomenon of contractualisation in the NHS from a public law perspective. She developed this research into a book entitled Accountability: A Public Law Analysis of Government By Contract which was published by Oxford University Press in 2001. She has also written articles on the regulation of the medical profession and on accountability and autonomy issues in the NHS. More recently, she has been working on a wider examination of government procurement and public/private partnership contracts from a public law perspective. Her book The Public Law of Government Contracts was published by OUP in September 2008.

In labour law, Professor Davies is the author of Perspectives on Labour Law, published by Cambridge University Press in the Law in Context series in 2004. The second edition of this book was published in 2009. This book examines a selection of topics in English labour law in the light of international human rights instruments and various economic arguments. Her interests in the labour law field are wide-ranging, encompassing international, European and domestic law. Her latest book, EU Labour Law, was published in May 2012.

Professor Davies gives tutorials in Administrative Law, Constitutional Law and Labour Law. She lectures in Labour Law for the faculty, and co-teaches the BCL/M.Jur. course in International and European Employment Law.



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Paul S Davies
Associate Professor of Law

St Catherine's College

Teaches: Commercial Law, Contract, Trusts, Restitution

Research interests: Law of obligations and property

Paul read Oriental Studies (Japanese) and then Law at Downing College, Cambridge, and spent a year in Poitiers studying French Law. After graduating, Paul worked in the Property and Trust Law Team at the Law Commission, and was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn.

He became a Fellow and College Lecturer in Law at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, in 2008, and was also a Newton Trust Lecturer in the Faculty of Law. He joined the Oxford Law Faculty as a CUF Lecturer in April 2013, and is a Fellow of St Catherine's College. Paul's teaching and research interests lie primarily in the law of obligations and property.

 



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Martin Dawidowicz
Departmental Lecturer in Public International Law

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: Public international law

Martin Dawidowicz is a Departmental Lecturer in Public International Law, in association with Pembroke College. Martin obtained his first degree in law from the University of Stockholm before completing the MJur at the University of Oxford and a PhD at the University of Cambridge, as a Gates Scholar.

Prior to his current appointment, Martin worked for several years as an associate at Lalive Avocats in Geneva where he specialised in public international law and investment treaty arbitration. He has substantial experience of international proceedings, in cases before the International Court of Justice, ICSID and other arbitral institutions. Previously, he worked in the United Nations Office of Legal Affairs in New York, and taught public international law to diplomats on the Oxford Foreign Service Programme, among other positions held.

Martin has varied research interests within the field of general international law and has published articles on aspects of the law of state responsibility, the law of treaties, international dispute settlement, and the law of self-determination in several leading publications, including the British Yearbook of International Law. His monograph, Third-Party Countermeasures in International Law, is forthcoming with Cambridge University Press.



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Eric Descheemaeker
Research Fellow, Institute of European and Comparative Law

Institute of European and Comparative Law

Teaches: European Union Law

Research interests: Tort, Roman Law, Comparative Law

Eric Descheemaeker is a research fellow of the Institute of European and Comparative Law, having previously been a D.Phil student and then a teaching fellow of St Catherine's College (2004-09). in 2008 he founded the French Law Moot, which continues to be held every March. He is now Lecturer in European Private Law at the University of Edinburgh.



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Andrew Dickinson
Fellow and Tutor, St Catherine's College
Professor of Law

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Conflict of Laws, Roman Law, Tort

Research interests: Private international law, in particular the law concerning obligations and the relationship with EU law.

Andrew Dickinson joined the Faculty in 2013, and is a fellow of St Catherine's College. After studying law in Oxford (MA and BCL; St Edmund Hall), Andrew attended the College of Law in Chester before qualifying as a solicitor with Clifford Chance in London. From 2011-2013, he was Professor of Private International Law at the University of Sydney.

Andrew is a Visiting Fellow at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law and an Associated Fellow of the new Max Planck Institute for International, European and Regulatory Procedural Law in Luxembourg.



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Dr Julie Dickson
Fellow and Senior Law Tutor, Somerville College & Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Law.

Somerville College & Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: European Union Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Jurisprudence, Philosophy of Law, European Union Law, Philosophy of European Union Law

Julie Dickson (LLB, Dip. L.P. Glasgow; MA, DPhil Oxon) is Fellow and Senior Law Tutor at Somerville College, and Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law. After completing a D. Phil in Philosophy of Law at Balliol College, Oxford, she held posts at the University of Leicester and University College London before taking up a Fellowship in Law at Somerville College in 2002.

Dr Dickson works mainly in general jurisprudence or philosophy of law, and especially on methodological issues, and her publications on this topic include her book, Evaluation and Legal Theory (2001). She is also interested in theoretical aspects of European Union Law, including the theory of legal systems in the EU context. Dr Dickson teaches Jurisprudence and European Union Law at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, and is the review articles editor of the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies. She also serves on the editorial board of legal philosophy journals, Legal Theory, Law and Philosophy, Transnational Legal Theory and Problema.

Dr Dickson's most recent book project - with regard to which she served as both co-editor and contributor - was to produce a new book featuring the best contemporary work combining legal and political philosophy and European Union law. J. Dickson and P. Eleftheriadis (eds.) Philosophical Foundations of European Union Law, was published by Oxford University Press in 2012. She is currently working on a new monograph on the methodology of Legal Philosophy, under contract with Oxford University Press, working title: Elucidating Law: The Philosophy of Legal Philosophy.



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Stephen Dimelow
Stipendiary Lecturer in Law

Mansfield College & Hertford College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law

Stephen Dimelow is a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Hertford College, teaching constitutional and administrative law. In addtion, he also convenes the Faculty's Public Law Discussion Group. 



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Graeme Dinwoodie
Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law

St Peter's College & Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre

Teaches: Intellectual Property

Graeme Dinwoodie is the Professor of Intellectual Property and Information Technology Law at the University of Oxford. He is also Director of the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre, and a Professorial Fellow of St. Peter's College. Prior to taking up the IP Chair at Oxford, Professor Dinwoodie was a Professor of Law and Director of the Program in Intellectual Property Law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law. He has also previously taught at the University of Cincinnati College of Law and University of Pennsylvania School of Law, and from 2005-2009 held a Chair in Intellectual Property Law at Queen Mary College, University of London. He teaches and writes in all aspects of intellectual property law, with an emphasis on the international and comparative aspects of the discipline. He is the author of five casebooks including TRADEMARKS AND UNFAIR COMPETITION: LAW AND POLICY (3d ed 2010) (with Janis) and INTERNATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW AND POLICY (2d ed. 2008) (with Hennessey, Perlmutter and Austin). Professor Dinwoodie's articles have appeared in several leading law reviews. He received the 2008 Ladas Memorial Award from the International Trademark Association for his article Confusion Over Use: Contextualism in Trademark Law (with Janis). Professor Dinwoodie has served as a consultant to the World Intellectual Property Organization on matters of private international law, as an Adviser to the American Law Institute Project on Principles on Jurisdiction and Recognition of Judgments in Intellectual Property Matters, and as a Consultant to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development on the Protection of Traditional Knowledge. He is a past Chair of the Intellectual Property Section of the Association of American Law Schools and the current President of the International Association for the Advancement of Teaching and Research in Intellectual Property (ATRIP). Professor Dinwoodie was elected to the American Law Institute in 2003, and in 2008 was awarded the Pattishall Medal for Excellence in Teaching Trademark and Trade Identity Law by the International Trademark Association. Prior to teaching, Professor Dinwoodie had been an associate with Sullivan and Cromwell in New York. Professor Dinwoodie holds a First Class Honors LL.B. degree from the University of Glasgow, an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, and a J.S.D. from Columbia Law School. He was the Burton Fellow in residence at Columbia Law School for 1988-89, working in the field of intellectual property law, and a John F. Kennedy Scholar at Harvard Law School for 1987-88.



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Simon Douglas
Associate Professor of Law

Jesus College

Teaches: Personal Property, Trusts, Roman Law, Advanced Property and Trusts

Research interests: Law of Property; Law of Tort

Simon Douglas is a law fellow at Jesus College, having formerly been a career development fellow at Wadham College. He took his undergraduate degree in Liverpool University, followed by the BCL and DPhil in Oxford.



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Sionaidh Douglas-Scott
Professor of European and Human Rights Law

Lady Margaret Hall

Teaches: European Union Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law

Research interests: EU law, human rights, legal theory, social theory, public law

Professor Douglas-Scott was born and grew up in Edinburgh. She studied philosophy, art history and aesthetics before taking a degree in law. Before coming to Oxford, she was Professor of Law at King's College London. She is a barrister and a member of Gray's Inn.

Sionaidh Douglas-Scott works primarily within the field of EU Public Law and legal and social theory, specializing, in particular, in EU human rights law. She is the author of the monograph, 'Constitutional Law of the EU', (2nd edition, forthcoming 2013).  She has published widely on EU human rights law, including articles on freedom of expression (especially on hate speech), and on the importance of maintaining human rights in the face of EU and national fights against terrorism. She has held visiting posts at various institutions, including the University of Bonn, where she was visiting Jean Monnet professor. Since 1993, she has co-taught and developed a course on comparative US and EU human rights law with Justice Anthony Kennedy of the US Supreme Court at the Salzburg Forum for International Studies

Her current projects include a monograph on European Human Rights law and she is also co-editing a Research Handbook on the European Union and Human Rights.

Professor Douglas-Scott has also recently completed a monograph, Law After Modernity  (publication date April, 2013) which explores at a more abstract level many of the issues of pluralism, justice and human rights also to be found in her work on the EU, and unusually, for a work of legal theory, is illustrated with various images and artistic works.



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Elizabeth Drummond
CDF in Property Law

Oxford Law Faculty & Trinity College

Research interests: Law of Trusts; Land Law; Succession Law

Elizabeth completed her undergraduate law degree and BCL at Worcester College, Oxford. Before joining the Faculty, she qualified as a solicitor and practised for three years before moving to the Law Commission as a team lawyer in the Property, Family and Trust Law team. At the Law Commission, Elizabeth worked on the review of the law of intestacy and family provision claims on death, leading to the Inheritance and Trustees’ Powers Act 2014. She was also involved with the projects leading to the enactment of the Perpetuities and Accumulations Act 2009 and the Trusts (Capital and Income) Act 2013, and other issues of trust, land and charity law reform.  



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Andrew Dyson
College Lecturer and Tutor in Law

Corpus Christi College

Teaches: Contract, Tort

Research interests: Commercial Remedies; Contract; Torts; Trusts; Unjust Enrichment

Andrew Dyson is a College Lecturer in Contract Law and the Law of Torts at Corpus Christi College, and a Tutor on the BCL Commercial Remedies course.

He holds degrees from Queens' College Cambridge (BA, Law) and Merton College Oxford (BCL), and is currently in his final year writing a doctoral thesis entitled 'Mitigation in the Law of Damages'. Andrew is a co-convenor of the Obligations Discussion Group.



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James Edwards
Associate Professor of Law

Brasenose College & Worcester College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Jurisprudence; political philosophy; philosophy of criminal law; criminal law

James Edwards joined the Law Faculty in October 2014. He is Tutorial Fellow in Law at Worcester College, and Lecturer in Law at Brasenose College.

James studied law as an undergraduate at Christ's College, Cambridge. He then moved to Oxford for the BCL, and stayed for the DPhil. James spent his final year as a doctoral student as Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Hertford College, then returned to Christ's as Fellow and Lecturer in Law before taking up his current post. 

His current research focuses on the limits of the criminal law. He is particularly interested in the ends the state legitimately uses the criminal law to pursue, and in the means by which the criminal law legitimately makes its contribution. James is interested in most aspects of legal and political philosophy. Recent publications include Reading HLA Hart's The Concept of Law (Hart, 2013).



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Horst Eidenmüller
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Corporate Insolvency Law

Horst Eidenmüller joined the Faculty of Law as a Visiting Professor in October 2009. A graduate of Cambridge (LLM 1989) and Munich University, Horst has held a research professorship at Munich University since 2003. The focus of his work is on company and insolvency law and on dispute resolution. He is known for his economic and empirical studies of important legal issues in these fields. Horst is a member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, a Research Associate of the European Corporate Governance Institute (ECGI) and a former fellow of the Institute for Advanced Studies in Berlin. He is a member of an expert committee that advises the German Justice Ministry on issues of company and insolvency law reform. In 2011 he was a visiting professor at Harvard Law School. In Oxford he lectures on Corporate Insolvency Law and on Comparative and European Corporate Law.



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Nancy Eisenhauer
College Lecturer

Mansfield College

Teaches: Public International Law, Roman Law

Dr Nancy Eisenhauer's main research interest is in international law, including public international law and international dispute resolution. Serves as a private consultant to States and other entities involved in international commercial arbitration and/or investor-State arbitration. Nancy Eisenhauer specialises in public international law and international dispute resolution and, when not teaching, acts as a private legal consultant in primarily investor-State, treaty-based arbitrations. She is a graduate of the University of Chicago and its Law School, where she served as a Bigelow Teaching Fellow immediately upon graduation. More recently, she served as an Attorney-Adviser for the U.S. Department of State. Prior to joining the State Department, she practised domestic and international litigation and arbitration at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.



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Richard Ekins
Associate Professor of Law; Tutorial Fellow

St John's College

Teaches: Philosophy of Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law

Research interests: Jurisprudence; Political Philosophy; Constitutional Law and Theory

Dr Richard Ekins is a Tutorial Fellow in Law at St John's College.  He received his BA, LLB (Hons) and BA (Hons) degrees from The University of Auckland, before going on to read for the BCL, MPhil and DPhil at Oxford. He has worked as a Judge's Clerk at the High Court of New Zealand at Auckland, and a Lecturer at Balliol College, and was a Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Auckland before moving (back) to Oxford in 2012.



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Pavlos Eleftheriadis
Associate Professor of Law

Mansfield College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests:

Legal and Political Philosophy, European Union Law

Pavlos Eleftheriadis is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law and a Fellow of Mansfield College. He teaches and publishes in the philosophy of law and European Union law. He is also a barrister in England and Wales and practises in EU law from Francis Taylor Building in the Temple.

Before joining Oxford he was a lecturer at  the London School of Economics. He has been a visiting professor of European Law at Columbia University and a visiting fellow in Hellenic Studies at Princeton. He was awarded the Bodossaki Prize for Law in 2005.

His book Legal Rights - which offered arguments against the legal positivist account of law and rights and in favour of a moral account of legal rights based on public reason -  was published by Oxford University Press in 2008. Since then he has written on the theory of human rights, the right to health, the idea of sovereignty, the probelm of parliamentary sovereignty as well as several aspects of the constitutional theory of the EU. He is currently at work on a monograph outlining a theory of EU law, tentatively enttiled A Union of Peoples

He is the co-editor (with Julie Dickson) of the collection of essays The Philosophical Foundations of European Union Law (Oxford University Press, 2012). 

He has been an active commentator on the Eurozone crisis in the press. His article on the Greek crisis, 'Only a New Political Order Can Rescue Greece', was published by the Financial Times on 28 May 2012. In May 2014 he was a candidate for the European Parliament in Greece with the new pro-European political party 'To Potami' ('The River').  

His personal website is at: www.pavloseleftheriadis.com. You can follow him on twitter at @PEleftheriadis. 



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Stefan Enchelmaier
Professor of European and Comparative Law

Lincoln College

Teaches: Company Law, Competition Law, Contract, Corporate Insolvency Law, European Business Regulation, Personal Property, Roman Law

Research interests: Comparative corporate insolvency, comparative company law, and European Union economic law

I studied law, philosophy, and Latin at the Universities of Cologne, Hamburg, and Edinburgh; obtained my doctorate from the University of Bonn with a thesis on European competition law, and my habilitation from the University of Munich with a thesis on comparative Anglo-German personal property law. After a stint in practice, I held posts in Oxford (1997-2003); Max-Planck-Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law, Munich (2003-2008); and York (2008-2013).



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Timothy Endicott
Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Legal Philosophy

Balliol College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Jurisprudence, Public Law, Law and Language

Timothy Endicott has been Dean of the Faculty of Law since October 2007. He is a Fellow in Law at Balliol College, and has been a Professor of Legal Philosophy since 2006. Professor Endicott writes on Jurisprudence and Constitutional and Administrative Law, with special interests in law and language and interpretation.

He is the author of Vagueness in Law (OUP 2000), and Administrative Law (OUP 2009). After graduating with the AB in Classics and English, summa cum laude, from Harvard, he completed the MPhil in Comparative Philology in Oxford, studied Law at the University of Toronto, and practised as a litigation lawyer in Toronto. He completed the DPhil in legal philosophy in Oxford in 1998.



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Luca Enriques
Allen & Overy Professor of Corporate Law

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Comparative and European Corporate Law, Company Law, Comparative Private Law, Corporate Finance, European Business Regulation

Research interests: Corporate Law, Corporate Governance, Securities Law, Financial Regulation

Luca Enriques is the Allen & Overy Professor of Corporate Law, in association with Jesus College. He studied law at the University of Bologna before completing his LLM at Harvard Law School and working at the Bank of Italy while at the same time earning a Doctorate degree in Business Law at Bocconi University. He then became a member of the University of Bologna Faculty of Law (1999-2007). During that period, he was a consultant to Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and an adviser to the Italian Ministry of the Economy and Finance on matters relating to corporate, banking and securities law with a special focus on European Union policy initiatives. He was a Commissioner at Consob, the Italian Securities and Exchange Commission between 2007 and 2012 and Professor of Business Law at LUISS University, Department of Law, in Rome in 2013-14.

He has held visiting posts at various academic institutions including Harvard Law School, where he was Nomura Visiting Professor of International Financial Systems (2012-13), Cornell Law School (1999 and 2000), the Instituto de Impresa in Madrid (2005), and the Radzyner School of Law at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya (2013-14).  

He has published widely in the fields of company law, corporate governance, and financial regulation. He is the Editor of the ECGI Working Paper Series in Law and an ECGI Research Fellow.



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Ariel Ezrachi
Slaughter and May Professor of Competition Law

Centre for Competition Law & Policy & Pembroke College

Teaches: Competition Law

Research interests: Competition Law

Ariel Ezrachi is the Slaughter and May Professor of Competition Law and a Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford. He serves as the Director of the University of Oxford Centre for Competition Law and Policy.

His research interests include European competition law, mergers and acquisitions and cross border transactions. His recently published papers focus on passive investments, excessive pricing, private labels and buyer power.

He is co-editor of the Journal of Antitrust Enforcement (OUP) and the author, editor and co-editor of numerous books, including EU Competition Law, An Analytical Guide to the Leading Cases (4th ed, 2014, Hart), Global Antitrust Compliance Handbook (2014, OUP), Research Handbook on International Competition Law (2012 EE), Intellectual Property and Competition Law: New Frontiers (2011, OUP), Criminalising Cartels: Critical Studies of an International Regulatory Movement (2011, Hart), Article 82 EC - Reflections on its recent evolution (2009, Hart) and Private Labels, Brands and Competition Policy (2009, OUP).

He convenes the Competition Law Group and teaches competition law at graduate and undergraduate levels. He develops training and capacity building programmes in competition law and policy for the private and public sectors, including training programmes for European judges endorsed and subsidised by the European Commission. He is a member of UNCTAD Research Partnership Platform and a former Non-Governmental Advisor to the ICN.



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Lucinda Ferguson
Associate Professor of Family Law

Oriel College

Teaches: Family Law, Tort

Research interests: Family law theory

Lucinda Ferguson is an Associate Professor of Family Law, University of Oxford; Tutorial Fellow in Law, Oriel College, Oxford; and Director of Studies (Law), Regent's Park College, Oxford.  She is Subject Convenor for the FHS Family Law special option.  As part of the undergraduate Family Law course, she provides lecture series in Financial Provision upon Relationship Breakdown, Children's Rights, Child Protection, and Parenthood.   In 2011-12, she was awarded the Oxford University Student Union Teaching Award for the Most Acclaimed Lecturer in the Social Sciences Division.

She holds an MA in Jurisprudence (English Law with German Law) from Magdalen College, Oxford, as well as a BCL from the University of Oxford.  She also holds an LLM from Queen's University, Canada.  From 2005 to 2007, she was Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Alberta in Canada.  She has worked with the Law Commission of Canada and Canadian provincial governments on various matters relating to family and children's law, particularly the use of age-based rules in regulating children's entitlement to make legally effective decisions and the impact of the UNCRC on provincial government policy and practice.  Her work has been cited by the Supreme Court of Canada.  

Her research interests concentrate on family law theory.  More particularly, her work adopts an analytic lens that recognises the synchronous tensions of legal theory, empiricism, social and public policy that are frequently co-terminous (and often conflated) within the field of family law.

Lucinda is current working on three projects:  firstly, an examination of the new and developing role for the parental responsibility concept in English law; secondly, a study of the privatisation of the substance of family law through the impact of family justice reforms on married couple's regulation of their financial obligations; and thirdly, a virtue-based model for decision-making in respect of children (as a way to move forward the rights 'vs' welfare debate).



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Liz Fisher
Professor of Environmental Law

Corpus Christi College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Environmental Law, Regulation, Legal Research Method

Research interests: Environmental Law, Risk Regulation, Administrative Law, EU Law

Liz Fisher, BA/LLB (UNSW), D Phil (Oxon) is Professor of Environmental Law at Corpus Christi College and UL lecturer in the Faculty of Law. She researches in the areas of environmental law, risk regulation and administrative law. Much of her work has explored the interrelationship between law, administration and regulatory problems. Her work has an important comparative dimension and she focuses in particular on these issues in the legal cultures of the UK, US, Australia, the EU, and the WTO. Her 2007 book, Risk Regulation and Administrative Constitutionalism, won the SLS Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship 2008. Recent work has focused on the problems created by interdisciplinarity in regulatory decision-making including the use of models in environmental regulation and the operational consequences of transparency in administrative law. She won an Oxford University Teaching Award in 2009 and was shortlisted for OUP National Law Teacher of the Year Award 2011. She is General Editor of the Journal of Environmental Law and has served as the editor of the Legislation and Reports Section of the Modern Law Review. Fisher convenes the environmental law courses in the Faculty and from October 2013 is Vice-Chair of the Law Board of the Law Faculty.



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Charles Foster

Ethox Centre & Green Templeton College

Teaches: Medical Law and Ethics

Charles Foster is a Fellow of Green Templeton College, a Research Associate at the Ethox and HeLEX Centres, University of Oxford, and a practising barrister. His current research interests concern human enhancement, theories of dignity, the limits of autonomy and problems of personalization in dementia. His practice at the Bar is entirely in medical law. He has been involved in many of the key cases in recent years, including Purdy in the House of Lords and Tony Nicklinson?s attempt to invoke the defence of necessity as a defence to medical murder.

A few representative publications are listed below. A full list of publications is here

Books

Medical Law: A Very Short Introduction: Oxford University Press, forthcoming, 2013

Dementia: Law and Ethics: Hart (with Jonathan Herring and Israel Doron), forthcoming, 2014

Human dignity in bioethics and law: Hart, 2011

Medical Law Precedents: Wildy, 2010

Choosing Life, choosing Death ? The Tyranny of Autonomy in Medical Law and Ethics: Hart, 2009

Medical mistakes: Claerhout Law Publishers, 2008

Elements of Medical Law: Claerhout Law Publishers, 2008, and Barry Rose Law Publishers, 2005

Regulating Health Care Quality: Legal and Professional Issues: Butterworth Heinemann/Elsevier Science (Editor with John Tingle and Kay Wheat)

Clinical Guidelines: Law, policy and practice: Cavendish, 2002 (editor with John Tingle).

Civil Advocacy: Cavendish (with Charles Bourne, Jacqui Gilliatt and Prashant Popat): 2nd Ed. 2001

Drafting: Cavendish, 2nd Ed. 2001 (with Elmer Doonan). Published also in Chinese, 2008.

Clinical confidentiality: Monitor Press, 2000 (with Nick Peacock)

Disclosure and Confidentiality: FT Law and Tax, 1996 (with T. Wynn and N. Ainley)

Book chapters

The relationship between medical ethics, law and professionalism, in Medical Ethics and Law At a Glance, Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming, 2013

What is health? In Current Legal Issues, OUP, 2013 (with Jonathan Herring)

Report writing and appearing in court: in Wildlife Forensics: Principles and Practice, Ed John and Margaret Cooper, Taylor and Francis, forthcoming, 2013

Veterinary Negligence: in Professional Negligence and Liability, Ed Mark Simpson, Informa/LLP, 2012 (and in previous editions since 2008)

The Carmentis Machine: Legal and ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging to guide treatment withdrawal in newborn infants (with Dominic Wilkinson). In Law and Neuroscience,Ed Michael Freeman, Current Legal Issues Vol. 13, OUP, 2011

Pre-trial clinical negligence issues: In Patient Safety Law: Policy and Practice, Ed John Tingle and Pippa Bark, Routledge, 2011

Challenging the Inquiry: In Public Inquiries, Ed. Jason Beer, OUP, 2011

Oral feeding difficulties and dilemmas: A guide to practical care, particularly towards the end of life: Royal College of Physicians, London (co-author: member of Working Party), 2010

What is the criminal law for? Chapter in ?Advancing Opportunity: routes in and out of criminal justice?, Ed Rob Allen, Smith Institute.

Family law in the Caucasus and Central Asia: 1800: In Encyclopaedia of Women and Islam: Brill Press, 2006

It should be, therefore it is: In Medical Law: Text, Cases and Materials, Oxford University Press: Ed. Emily Jackson, 2006.

Personal Injury Law and Precedents: Jordans/APIL: (contributor) 2006 and subsequent editions to 2010.

Disciplinary jurisdiction over the medical and other healthcare professions, in Regulating Health Care Quality: Legal and Professional Issues: Butterworth Heinemann/Elsevier Science (Editor, Foster, Tingle and Wheat), 2004

Civil procedure, trial issues and clinical guidelines, in Clinical Guidelines: Law, policy and practice: Cavendish, 2002 (Edited Foster and Tingle)

Negligence: the legal perspective. In Nursing Law and Ethics: Blackwell Scientific. 2nd Ed, 2002, and subsequent editions in 2006,  2009 and 2013). Ed. Tingle and Cribb.

Healthcare Law: The impact of the Human Rights Act 1998 (Ed. Garwood-Gowers, Tingle and Lewis): Cavendish, 2001: Chapter on Access, Procedure and the Human Rights Act 1998 in Medical Cases.

Articles

Submitted

Autonomy in the courtroom: a principle fit for purpose? Journal of Moral Philosophy (invited contribution for the Essex Autonomy project special issue of JMP)

Forthcoming

When autonomy kills: the case of Ben Garci (with Mirko Garasic) Medicine and Law

Published

Response to McGee re The Double Effect Effect (with Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham and Tony Hope): Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics

The elephant in the (board) room: the role of contract research organisations in international clinical research (with Aisha Malik): American Journal of Bioethics (2012) 12(11) 49-50

Putting dignity to work: The Lancet (2012) 379: 9831; 2044-2045

Should female cosmetic genital surgery and genital piercing be regarded ethically and legally as female genital mutilation? (with Brenda Kelly): British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2012: DOI 10.1111/j.1471-0528.2011.03260x

?Please don?t tell me?: The right not to know. (with Jonathan Herring). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics (2012) 21, 20-29

Welfare means relationality, virtue and altruism (with Jonathan Herring), Legal Studies 480

If you ask the wrong question, you?ll get the wrong answer: Journal of Medical Ethics: 2012: doi. 10.1136/mediethics-2012-100682

What sort of DNAR order is that? (with Tony Hope), Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine (2012) 105; 279

Dignity and the ownership of body parts: Journal of Medical Ethics, doi:10.1136/medethics-2012-100763

Assisted Suicide: Engaging with the debate: Living and Dying Well, November 2012

The Double Effect Effect (with Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham and Tony Hope): Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics (2011) 20(1): 46-55

Autonomy, Consent and the law: Review of the book of that name, by Sheila McLean: Mortality: 15(2): 178-179

?Please don?t tell me?: The Right Not to Know? (2011) 21 Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics (with Jonathan Herring) 1-10

Autonomy should chair, not rule: The Lancet, Vol. 375(9712):368-69

Why doctors should get a life: Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 102(12) 519-520

Autonomy and Welfare as Amici curiae (with Mikey Dunn): Medical Law Review, 2010

Turning a blind eye to crime: health professionals and the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (with Tony Hope and Sally Hope): British Journal of General Practice 60(570); 64-65(2)

Abortion: Three perspectives. Review of the book of that name by Tooley, Devine and Jaggar: Contemporary Review

Bad laws: Review of the book of that name, by Philip Johnston, Contemporary Review, Winter 2010

Advance directives and personality-changing illness: British Journal of Nursing (2010) Vol 19, No. 15; 926-927

Medical law too often doffs its cap to the doctor?s white coat: The Times, 21 May 2009, Law p. 66

The NHS should not treat self-inflicted illness: Oxford University online debate with Dr. Mark Sheehan

Blaming the patient: Contributory negligence in medical malpractice litigation (with Jonathan Herring): Professional Negligence (2009) Vol. 25(2): 76-90

Animal-Human hybrids: Do theology or philosophy help? Law and Justice: (2008) No. 160: 6-12

Nutritional support at the end of life: legal issues: European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology 19(5): 389 (May 2007)

Simple rationality? The law of healthcare resource allocation in England. Journal of Medical Ethics, 2007; 33: 404-407

Should nurses perform surgical abortion? Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care (2007) Vol. 33(3): 221

Blair?s laws: an audit of a depressing decade: Contemporary Review, Autumn 2007, p. 304

Submissions from non-existent claimants: The non-identity problem and the law : Medicine and Law: Volume 25 Number 1 (March 2006) (with Professor Tony Hope and Dr. John McMillan)

Always look on the bright side of life: The case of Re MB: Healthcare Risk Report, June 2006, Vol. 12(7): p. 23

The edge of life and the edge of the law: Re MB. Family Law Journal, June 2006, No. 67: p. 8

The role of clinical guidelines in medical negligence litigation: A shift from the Bolam standard? : (with Ash Samanta, Michelle Mello, John Tingle and Jo Samanta): Medical Law Review, 14, Autumn 2006 pp.321-366

Law and the Brain (Review): British Journal of Psychiatry (2006) 189: 570

Will clinical guidelines replace judges? Medicine and Law (2006), Vol. 25: 4: 586-592

Misrepresentations about prognosis and palliative options: some legal considerations: Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, January 2005.

What is man, that the judges are mindful of him? Lessons from the PVS cases: Journal of Philosophy, Science and Law, Vol. 5, September 2005

What autonomy really means: British Medical Journal: 2005; 331: 841-2 (8 October 2005)

?Pro-choice? ought to mean exactly what it says: The Times: 11 October 2005: Law section p. 10

Burke: A tale of unhappy endings: Journal of Personal Injury Law: December 2005, p. 293: [2005] JPIL Issue 4/05: 293 and on the website of the UK Clinical Ethics Network.

Pro-life lobby and its pyrrhic victories: The Times, 26 October 2004: Law section, p. 5

Those about to die must be told all the facts: (Issues of consent in euthanasia): The Times, 3 June 2003: Law section, p. 5

International law: Another casualty of the Iraq War? Contemporary Review, August 2003, p. 76

The questions to ask a husband (or wife) before sex (R v Mohammed Dica): The Times, 21 October 2003: Law Section, p. 6

The price of super-specialism: The demise of the common lawyer: New Law Journal, Vol. 152 No. 7046: p. 1297 (6 September 2002)

Consent and confidentiality: Legal implications of electronic transmission of prescriptions

(With Professor Joy Wingfield): Pharmaceutical Journal, 7 September 2002, (Vol. 269), p. 328.

Plunge in the deep end of the gene pool: The Times, 19 November 2002: Law section p. 4

Fifty glorious legal years? English law during the reign of Queen Elizabeth II: Contemporary Review, December 2002, p. 321



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Sandra Fredman
Rhodes Professor of the Laws of the British Commonwealth and the United States

Pembroke College

Teaches: Human Rights Law, Labour/Employment Law

Research interests: Labour Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights, Anti-discrimination Law

Sandra Fredman is Rhodes Professor of the Laws of the British Commonwealth and the USA at Oxford University. She was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2005 and became a QC (honoris causa) in 2012.  She is Honorary Professor of Law at the University of Cape Town and a fellow of Pembroke College Oxford.  She has written and published widely on anti-discrimination law, human rights law and labour law, including numerous peer-reviewed articles, and three monographs: Human Rights Transformed (OUP 2008); Discrimination Law (2nd ed, OUP 2011); and Women and the Law (OUP 1997),as well as two co-authored books: The State as Employer (Mansell, 1988), with Gillian Morris, and Labour Law and Industrial Relations in Great Britain (2nd ed Kluwer, 1992) with Bob Hepple. She has also edited several books: Discrimination and Human Rights: The Case of Racism (OUP,2001); and Age as an Equality Issue (Hart, 2003) with Sarah Spencer; and has written numerous articles in peer-reviewed law journals. She was awarded a three year Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship in 2004 to further her research into socio-economic rights and substantive equality. She is South African and holds degrees from the University of Witwatersrand and the University of Oxford.. She has acted as an expert adviser on equality law and labour legislation in the EU, Northern Ireland, the UK, India, South Africa, Canada and the UN; and is a barrister practising at Old Square Chambers. She founded the Oxford Human Rights Hub in 2012, of which she is the Director.



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Judith Freedman
Pinsent Masons Professor of Taxation Law

Worcester College

Teaches: Taxation, Law and Finance

Research interests: Corporate and business taxation, taxation policy, small businesses, law and accounting, corporate social responsibility

Judith Freedman is Professor of Taxation Law and a Fellow of Worcester College. She worked in the corporate tax department of Freshfields before joining the University of Surrey as a lecturer in law in 1980. She then moved to the London School of Economics (LSE) with a secondment to the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies as Senior Research Fellow in Company and Commercial Law from 1989-92. Whilst at the LSE, she lectured and researched on tax and company law. At Oxford, her focus is taxation, particularly corporate and business taxation, but she has a continuing interest in related areas of corporate law, corporate governance, corporate social responsibility, the interaction between law and accounting and small businesses. She participated in the establishment of the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation and is now its Director of Legal Research and a member of its Steering Committee and Advisory Board.  She has served on a number of Law Society, DTI and Inland Revenue Committees and advisory groups and was a member of the Company Law Review's working party on small companies . She was a member of the Office of Tax Simplification Consultative Committee on Small Business Taxation and the Tax Avoidance Study Group appointed to report to the Exchequer Secretary on the question of a General Anti-avoidance Rule. She has held the Anton Philips Visiting Chair at the University of Tilburg and is an Adjunct  Professor in the Australian School of Taxation and Business Law, University of New South Wales. She is the general editor of the British Tax Review and is on the editorial boards of the Modern Law Review, the eJournal of Tax Research, The Canadian Tax Journal, The Australian Tax Review and The Tax Journal. She is a member of the Council and the Tax Law Review Committee of the Institute for Fiscal Sutudies, and was one of the few lawyers contributing to the Mirrlees report 'Reforming the Tax System for the 21st Century. Judith was appointed a CBE in the 2013 New Year's Honours List for her services to tax research.

Judith is currently Development Co-ordinator for the Law Faculty.

 Further information about tax at Oxford can be found on the tax pages of the Faculty of Law website and the  website of the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation



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Iginio Gagliardone
British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Research interests: Freedom of expression, Politics of technology, Media and governance in Sub-Saharan Africa, ICTs for development, Media and peace-building, China-Africa relations

Iginio Gagliardone is British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP) at the Centre for Socio Legal Studies. He is also Research Associate at the Centre of Governance and Human Rights at the University of Cambridge and at the Centre for Global Communication Studies (CGCS), Annenberg School of Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

He completed his PhD at the LSE investigating the relationship between Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and nation building in Ethiopia.



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Denis Galligan
Professor of Socio-Legal Studies

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & Wolfson College

Teaches: Civil Procedure, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Socio-legal Studies, Law in Society, Administrative Justice, Procedural Justice, Criminal Justice, Evidence, Jurisprudence

Denis Galligan, DCL 2000, BCL 1974, MA 1976, LL.B. (Queensland) 1970,

Barrister Gray's Inn 1996 and Queensland; 1971, Rhodes Scholar for Queensland 1971, Br Acad Wolfson Research Fellow 1981. Professor of Socio-Legal Studies 1993 - continuing; Director of the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies  1993 - 2008; University of Oxford, and Professorial Fellow, Wolfson College, 1993- continuing .

Formerly: Lecturer, UCL, 1974-76, Fellow, Jesus College. Oxford, and CUF Lecturer, 1976-81, Senior Lecturer Melbourne, 1982-84, Professor of Law 1985-93, Dean 1987-90. Southampton, Professor of Law, Sydney, 1990-92.



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Dev Gangjee
Associate Professor of Intellectual Property Law

St Hilda's College & Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre

Teaches: Contract, Intellectual Property, Tort

Research interests: Intellectual Property

Dev Gangjee joined Oxford in 2013 as a University Lecturer in Intellectual Property within the Law Faculty as well as a Tutorial Fellow at St Hilda's College. He is also Director of the Oxford Diploma in IP Law and Practice. Prior to this, he was a senior lecturer at the London School of Economics (2005-2013). Dev is a graduate of the National Law School of India and Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He has acted in an advisory capacity for national governments, law firms, international organisations and the European Commission on IP issues.

Dev's research focuses broadly on Intellectual Property (IP), but with a special emphasis on Branding and Trade Marks, Geographical Indications and Copyright law. Additional research interests include the history and political economy of IP, collective and open innovation, and the interface between IP and theories of development. He is presently an Academic Member of the Oxford IP Research Centre and a Research Affiliate with IP Osgoode, Canada. He is also an Editorial Board member of the Modern Law Review and co-editor for its Legislation and Reports Section.



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John Gardner
Professor of Jurisprudence

University College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Philosophy of law (including philosophy of criminal law, private law, and public law); moral and political philosophy

John Gardner FBA is Professor of Jurisprudence and a Fellow of University College. He was formerly Reader in Legal Philosophy at King's College London (1996-2000), Fellow and Tutor in Law at Brasenose College, Oxford (1991-6) and Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford (1986-91). He has also held visiting positions at Columbia University, Yale University, the University of Texas, Princeton University, the Australian National University and the University of Auckland. He serves on the editorial boards of numerous journals including the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Legal Theory, Law and Philosophy, and The Journal of Moral Philosophy. Called to the Bar in 1988, he has been a Bencher of the Inner Temple since 2002 (although he does not practice).



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Simon Gardner
Professor of Law

Lincoln College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Land Law, Trusts

Research interests: Real Property, Trusts, Criminal Law

Simon Gardner took a BA in law and a BCL at Oxford, then worked for a year as a lecturer at the University of Nottingham, before moving to a fellowship at Lincoln College and joining the Oxford law faculty. He has also undertaken other roles within Lincoln College (including Sub-Rector, Dean, and Tutor for Admissions) and the Oxford law faculty (including Chair of the Faculty Board, and Director of Graduate Studies responsible for the BCL and MJur programmes). He works principally in the fields of property law and criminal law, normally giving tutorials (for which he has received a Teaching Excellence Award) in Land Law, Trusts, and Criminal Law, and lectures in Land Law and Trusts. He is currently convenor of the faculty's Land Law and Trusts groups. He is an academic member of the Chancery Bar Association.



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Joshua Getzler
Professor of Law and Legal History

St Hugh's College

Teaches: Contract, Legal History, Roman Law, Trusts, Advanced Property and Trusts

Research interests: Modern Legal History, Law and Economics, Obligations, Equity and Trusts, Property Theory, Law and Finance, Capital Markets

Joshua Getzler was appointed in 1993. In his modern legal research he is working on the duties of investment agents in financial markets, on the legal and economic structure of debt and equity, on the tortious and contractual liability of entities, and on theories of co-ownership and fiduciary duty. In his historical research he is working on the relationships of public finance and private banking and investment, and the evolution of trust, corporate and charitable forms, in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He is also studying the role of the lord chancellors in law and politics before the Great Reform Act, from Macclesfield and King through to Hardwicke and Eldon. His first degrees in law and history were taken at the Australian National University in Canberra, and his doctorate in Oxford, as a member of Balliol and Nuffield Colleges. He has taught and researched at the Australian National University, the Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, the University of Chicago, and most recently at the University of Pennsylvania as Bok Visiting International Professor of Law in 2012. He maintains links to Australia as Conjoint Professor of Law at the University of New South Wales.



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Nazila Ghanea
University Lecturer in International Human Rights Law (Department of Continuing Education)

A University Lecturership is a tenured (or tenure-track) position involving teaching and research duties for the University. A College Tutorial Fellowship is often held jointly with the University Lecturership. University Lecturers have greater University obligations and lighter College obligations than CUF Lecturers.

Kellogg College & Department for Continuing Education

Teaches: Public International Law, Human Rights Law

Research interests: Human Rights Law, identities and human rights law, freedom of religion or belief, minority rights, human rights in the Middle East

Dr Nazila Ghanea is University Lecturer in International Human Rights Law at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Kellogg College (BA Keele, MA Leeds, PhD Keele, MA Oxon). She serves as a member of the OSCE Panel of Experts on Freedom of Religion or Belief. was the founding editor of the international journal of Religion and Human Rights and now serves on its Editorial Board as well as the Advisory Board of the Oxford Journal of Law and Religion. She has been a visiting academic at a number of institutions including Columbia and NYU, and previously taught at the University of London and Keele University, UK and in China. Nazila’s research spans freedom of religion or belief, freedom of expression, women’s rights, minority rights and human rights in the Middle East. Her publications include nine books, five UN publications as well as a number of journal articles and reports. Her research has been funded by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Board, the UK Economic and Social Research Council, Open Society and the Qatar Foundation. She has been invited to address UN expert seminars on seven occasions. From 2012-2014 she is co-leading a research team to look at the Domestic Impact of UN Treaty Ratification in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council. From 2010-2013 she was part of a research term investigating ‘Religion and Belief, Discrimination and Equality in England and Wales: Theory, Policy and Practice’ (2010-2013). She has also received a number of university scholarships and academic awards. Nazila has acted as a human rights consultant/expert for a number of governments, the UN, UNESCO, OSCE, Commonwealth, Council of Europe and the EU. She has facilitated international human rights law training for a range of professional bodies around the world, lectured widely and carried out first hand human rights field research in a number of countries including Malaysia, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom. She is a regular contributor to the media on human rights matters. This coverage has included BBC World Service, BBC Woman’s Hour, The Times, Radio Free Europe, The Guardian, Avvenire, The Telegraph, The National (UAE), New Statesman, Sveriges Radio, TA3 Slovakia and El Pais.



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Gilles Giacca

Oxford Law Faculty & Pembroke College

Research interests: His main research interests lie in the field of public international law, collective security, international humanitarian law, human rights law, refugee law as well as weapons law.

Dr Gilles Giacca is a Research Fellow at the Law Faculty, Co-ordinator of the Oxford Martin School Human Rights for Future Generations programme, and Reserach Associate, Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict. He holds a MA from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva and a LLM from the University of Essex and holds a PhD in International Law from the University of Geneva and IHEID.

Between 2006 and 2012, Gilles Giacca was teaching assistant and then research fellow at the Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian and Human Rights Law. Gilles has advised States, international organizations and NGOs on matters of international law. He has also provided training on international law to diplomats and practitioners.

His teaching interests include public international law, the law of armed conflict, international human rights law, weapons law and arms trade. He regularly delivers lectures for the Master of Advanced Studies in Humanitarian Action (CERAH) and for the Advanced Training Course on Monitoring Economic, Social and Cultural Rights at the Law Faculty of the University of Geneva.



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Guy Goodwin-Gill
Senior Research Fellow, All Souls College

All Souls College

Teaches: Human Rights Law, Public International Law

Research interests: Public International Law including international organisations, human rights, migrants and refugees, elections and democratisation; children's rights

Professor Guy S. Goodwin Gill is also Professor of International Refugee Law, was formerly Professor of Asylum Law at the University of Amsterdam, and served as a Legal Adviser in the Office of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) from 1976-1988. He practises as a Barrister from Blackstone Chambers, London, and he has written extensively on refugees, migration, international organizations, elections, democratization, and child soldiers; Recent publications include/ The Refugee in International Law/, (OUP, 2007), 3rd edn. with Dr Jane McAdam; /Free and Fair Elections/, (Inter-Parliamentary Union, 2nd edn., 2006); /Basic Documents on Human Rights/, (OUP, 2006), 5th edn., with Ian Brownlie, eds.



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Imogen Goold
Associate Professor of Law

St Anne's College

Teaches: Tort, Philosophy of Law, Medical Law and Ethics

Research interests: Reproductive medicine, history of reproductive medicine, bioethics, property

Imogen Goold studied Law and Modern History at the University of Tasmania, Australia, receiving her PhD in 2005. Her doctoral research explored the use of property law to regulate human body parts. She also received a Masters degree in Bioethics from the University of Monash in 2005. From 1999, she was a research member of the Centre for Law and Genetics, where she published on surrogacy laws, legal constraints on access to infertility treatments and proprietary rights in human tissue. In 2002, she took up as position as a Legal Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission, working on the inquiries into Genetic Information Privacy and Gene Patenting. After leaving the ALRC in 2004, she worked briefly at the World Health Organisation, researching the provision of genetic medical services in developing countries. She is now examining the impact of moral arguments on the regulation of IVF and also writing a book based on her work on body part ownership.



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James Goudkamp
Associate Professor of Law

Keble College

Teaches: Roman Law, Tort, Trusts, Philosophy of Law, Civil Procedure, Contract

Research interests: Tort law; civil procedure; commercial law; criminal law

James Goudkamp is Fellow of Keble College and Associate Professor in the Oxford Law Faculty. His expertise is principally in tort law, but his research interests span the law of obligations and extend also to civil procedure. 

James completed undergraduate degrees in science and law at the University of Wollongong, taking the law degree with first class honours and the University Medal. 

James then studied for the Bachelor of Civil Law and Master of Philosophy of Law at Magdalen College, Oxford, taking both degrees with distinction. He continued continued his studies at Magdalen and submitted a thesis on tort law defences to earn the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. He published a descendent of this thesis as a monograph: James Goudkamp, Tort Law Defences (Hart Publishing, Oxford, 2013). This book was as the Joint Runner Up for the Society of Legal Scholars Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship 2014.

James was previously a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford (2011-2013), the Shaw Foundation Junior Research Fellow in Law, Jesus College, Oxford (2009-2011), Lecturer in Law, St Hilda's College, Oxford (2008-2009), Associate to the Hon Justice Michael Kirby AC CMG of the High Court of Australia (2005-2006) and Associate Lecturer in Law, Faculty of Law, University of Wollongong (2003-2005).

James holds or has held visiting positions at Harvard Law School, the Inner Temple, the National University of Singapore, the University of Western Australia and the University of Wollongong. 

James is available to supervise research students in any area of tort law (and certain other parts of the law of obligations) or civil procedure.



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Kate Greasley
Stowell Junior Research Fellow in Law

New College

Teaches: Philosophy of Law, Medical Law and Ethics


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Leslie Green
Professor of the Philosophy of Law

Balliol College

Teaches: Philosophy of Law, Human Rights Law

Research interests: Legal Philosophy, Jurisprudence, Constitutional Theory, Human Rights

Les Green is the Professor of the Philosophy of Law and Fellow of Balliol College.  He also holds a part-time appointment as Professor of Law and Distinguished University Fellow at Queen's University in Canada.  After beginning his teaching career as a fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford, he moved to Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto.  He has also been a visiting professor at many other law faculties, including Berkeley, NYU, Chicago and, for some years, at the University of Texas at Austin.  Professor Green writes and teaches in the areas of jurisprudence, constitutional theory, and moral and political philosophy.  He serves on the board of several journals and is co-editor of the annual Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law and of the book series Oxford Legal Philosophy.



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Sarah Green
Associate Professor of Law

St Hilda's College

Teaches: Contract, Tort, Personal Property, Criminal Law

Research interests: Wrongful Interference with Assets; Personal Property; Torts (particularly causation in negligence); Sales

Sarah joined the Oxford Law Faculty in September 2010, as a fellow of St Hilda's College. Her research focuses on the causal element of the negligence inquiry and the interface between tort and property, with a particular emphasis on the law's treatment of intangibles. Sarah is currently working on a monograph entitled 'Causation in Negligence', to be published by Hart in 2014. Her last book was 'The Tort of Conversion' (Hart Publishing, 2009) with John Randall QC, the first major work on the subject in English law. She has published various articles on aspects of tort, property and contract in a wide range of journals, including the Conveyancer and Property Lawyer, Journal of Business Law, Law Quarterly Review, Lloyds Maritime and Commercial Law Quarterly, Medical Law Review and Modern Law Review. In terms of teaching, Sarah's principal interests lie in Torts, Personal Property and Contract, reflecting her research interests in the fields of private law and commercial law.



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Katharine Grevling
Associate Professor of Law

Magdalen College

Teaches: Civil Procedure, Contract, Criminal Law, Evidence, Trusts

Research interests: Evidence, Trusts

Katharine Grevling, LL.B. (Tasmania), MA, BCL, D.Phil. (Oxford)



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Louise Gullifer
Professor of Commercial Law

Harris-Manchester College

Teaches: Commercial Law, Contract, Corporate Finance, Roman Law, Corporate Insolvency Law, Law and Finance, Transnational Commercial Law

Research interests: Common Law, Commercial Law, Corporate Finance law

Louise Gullifer has been teaching at Oxford since 1991. Before that she practised at the Commercial Bar in chambers at 3 Gray's Inn Place (now 3 Verulam Buildings), under her maiden name (Louise Edwards). She remains an honorary member of those chambers. She teaches Roman law, Contract law, Commercial Law, Corporate Finance law and Corporate Insolvency law and is the senior law tutor at Harris Manchester College. From 1994-97 she was a Fellow of Brasenose College.   She is Chair of the University Student Disciplinary Panel and has been the Oxford Law Faculty Development Co-ordinator.    

Her research interests focus broadly on commercial law and corporate finance.   She has co-authored books on security and title financing and corporate finance, and is presently co-authoring books on personal property and set-off in arbitration.    She is particularly interested in financial collateral and intermediated securities, and recently delivered a Current Legal Problems lecture on financial collateral.    She is a member of the Executive Committee of the Secured Transaction Law Reform Project and is also the Oxford Law Faculty Academic Lead for the Cape Town Convention Academic Project.



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Noam Gur

Lincoln College

Teaches: Tort

Research interests: Jurisprudence

From 1 September 2014, I will be contactable via the School of Law at Queen Mary, University of London.



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Birke Häcker
Fifty-Pound Fellow, All Souls College

All Souls College


Birke Häcker is a Fifty-Pound Fellow of All Souls College where she was previously an Examination Fellow (from 2001 to 2008). In 2007/08 she taught as a Stipendiary Lecturer at Lady Margaret Hall. She now works in Munich as a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance and holds a Lectureship at the Law Faculty of Munich's Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität.

Do not remove this block. Alternative spellings for search engine robots: Hacker Haecker hacker haecker


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Christopher Hare
Travers Smith Associate Professor of Corporate and Commercial Law

Somerville College

Teaches: Corporate Finance, Company Law

Research interests: Law of obligations and the corporate and commercial law fields, with particular focus on domestic and international banking law, corporate finance, and shareholder remedies.

Christopher Hare is an Associate Professor of Law and a Fellow of Somerville College. Christopher was an undergraduate at Trinity College, Cambridge and was in the first cohort of students to spend their third year at the University of Poiters, France. He then spent a year at Harvard Law School (LLM) and read for the BCL at Brasenose College.

 

Christopher initially practised as a barrister at 3 Verulam Buildings, Gray's Inn before moving to a fellowship and college lectureship at Jesus College, Cambridge.

He has spent the last seven years in New Zealand, where he was a Senior Lecturer in the Law Faculty at the University of Auckland. Christopher's teaching and research interests lie broadly in the law of obligations and the corporate and commercial law fields, with particular focus on domestic and international banking law, corporate finance, and shareholder remedies.



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Barbara Havelkova

Balliol College

Teaches: European Union Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Gender legal studies and feminist jurisprudence, equality and antidiscrimination law, human rights, labour law, constitutional law, EU law

Barbara Havelková completed her first degree in law at the Charles University in Prague and holds an LL.M. from Europa-Institut, Saarland University. She obtained a DPhil from Oxford for her research on “Gender in law under and after State Socialism: the example of the Czech Republic”.

Barbara was previously the Herchel Smith Lecturer and Fellow in Law at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and the CSET Teaching Fellow in EU Law at the Oxford Faculty of Law. She worked for Clifford Chance Prague, trained at the Legal Service of the European Commission and in the Chambers of AG Poiares Maduro at the Court of Justice of the European Union. She was an academic visitor at several law schools, including Harvard University and University of Michigan as a Fulbright scholar.



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Geneviève Helleringer

St Catherine's College & Institute of European and Comparative Law

Research interests: Private Law (obligations, commercial contracts, banking law) Corporate and Financial Market Law Comparative Contract Law and European Legal Culture Law and Behavioural studies

Geneviève Helleringer is a fellow of the Institute of European and Comparative Law (IECL) at the Law Facutly and a fellow of St Catherine’s College.  She is an associate law professor at Essec Business School.

Her research focuses on contract, corporate and financial law and alternative dispute resolution, and draws on insights from economics, sociology and psychology. She has written, edited, or contributed to numerous books and articles. She is an executive editor of the Journal of Financial Regulation (Oxford University Press) and editorial board member of the Studies in European Economic Law and Regulation book series (Springer). Geneviève has been a regular visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg. 

Geneviève holds a JD from Columbia University (1999), an MSc in legal sociology from Paris II Panthéon Assas University (2009), as well as an MSc and a doctorate in private law from the Sorbonne University (2010) (receiving three national prizes for her doctoral thesis, including the French Academy Grand Prize). She is admitted to the New York and the Paris Bars. She studied philosophy, mathematics, and literature, as an undergraduate, and economics and social sciences later at Essec Business School and Sciences-Po Paris, as well as experimental psychology at a graduate level at Oxford University. Before completing her doctoral work, she worked for Shiseido in Japan and practised corporate law at Willkie Farr & Gallagher and at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in New York and Paris (2000-2006). 

 



photo of Jonathan Herring

Jonathan Herring
Professor of Law

Exeter College

Teaches: Contract, Criminal Law, Family Law, Medical Law and Ethics

Research interests: Medical Law and ethics, Elder Law, Criminal Law, Family Law, Law and Caring

Jonathan Herring has written on criminal, family and medical law. He focuses on how the law interacts with the important things in life: not money, companies or insurance; but love, friendship and intimacy. In his work he seeks to develop ways in the law can recognise and value the goods in activities such as carework and sex, while protecting people from the harms that so often result. Criminal Law Jonathan Herring has written two best-selling textbooks on criminal law. He has researched the law on sexual offences, crimes against corpses and failures of parents to protect children from death. Elder Law Jonathan Herring has written a leading monograph on the law’s treatment of older people. He has also published on legal issues surrounding dementia. Family Law Jonathan Herring has written a popular textbook in this subject and has edited several books on theoretical issues in family law. He has examined the way the law balances the interests and rights of children and parents. He has also analyzed legal disputes over contact between children and parents and issues surrounding children's rights. He is a member of the editorial board for the Family Court Reports and is an editor for the Child and Family Law Quarterly. Medical Law Jonathan Herring has written a leading textbook on this subject. He has written on the regulation of pregnancy and enforced medical treatment. He has also co-authored with Dr P-L Chau a series of papers on the medical and legal definition of sex, with particular consideration of intersex people and issues surrounding human cloning. He has also written on the ownership of body parts and bodily fluids, as part of a project for the Cambridge Socio-Legal Group. He is currently working on legal issues surrounding carers.



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Andrew Higgins
Associate Professor of Civil Procedure

Mansfield College

Teaches: Contract, Tort, Civil Procedure, Civil Procedure

Research interests: Civil procedure, tort, causation

Andrew is an Associate Professor in Civil Procedure at the Law Faculty and a Fellow in Law at Mansfield College. He has taught civil procedure on Oxford’s BCL/MJUR course since 2008 and has taught contract and tort for University College and New College respectively. From 2015 Andrew will take on the General Editorship of Civil Justice Quarterly.

Andrew completed a BA/LLB (hons) at the University of Melbourne in 2001 and the BCL in 2005. He completed a Dphil at Oxford on legal professional privilege in 2011, and published a book on ‘Legal Professional Privilege for Corporations: A Guide to Four Major Common Law Jurisdictions’ with Oxford University Press in 2014. He has been a visiting scholar with NYU's Hauser Global Law School Program and an occasional guest lecturer in civil procedure at Melbourne Law School.

Andrew worked as a solicitor at the Australian law firm Slater & Gordon until 2007, and has been a practising barrister at the Victorian Bar since 2011. His main area of practice is mass tort litigation and has worked on asbestos, thalidomide and tobacco litigation amongst others. He has advised the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission on whether the use of light and mild descriptors for cigarettes constituted misleading advertising, assisted the US Department of Justice on its RICO claim against the US tobacco industry, US v Philip Morris et al, and advised the Australian Government on the defence of its tobacco plain packaging laws against constitutional and international legal challenges. He has received awards for his work exposing British American Tobacco’s “document retention policies” in McCabe v British American Tobacco including from a coalition of public health NGOs.

Andrew’s main research interests are civil procedure, tort and causation.

 



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Christopher Hodges
Head of the CMS Research Programme on Civil Justice Systems

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Research interests: Civil Justice Systems, Funding and Costs, Collective Redress, EU Regulatory Law, Product Liability



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Lord Hoffmann
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Intellectual Property

Lord Hoffmann read law at Queen’s (Vinerian Scholarship 1957) and was Stowell Civil Law Fellow at Univ from 1961-1973.  He then practised at the Chancery Bar and was appointed a judge in 1985. From 1995 until 2009 he was a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary and gave a number of leading judgments on patent law. He now practises as an international commercial arbitrator and gives seminars in Hilary Term on patent law for the FHS paper on intellectual property.



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Laura Hoyano
Associate Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, and Senior Research Fellow in Law at Wadham College

Wadham College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Evidence, Tort, Medical Law and Ethics, Human Rights Law

Research interests: Evidence, Human Rights, Medical Law & Ethics, Tort Law, Criminal Law

Laura Hoyano graduated from the University of Alberta in Canada with two degrees in medieval history before being converted to law, receiving a JD (Gold Medallist) from the University of Alberta. She was called to the Alberta Bar in 1983 and practised commercial, insurance and catastrophic personal injury law for 10 years, interrupted by a sabbatical year in 1990-91 to read for the B.C.L. at Balliol College, Oxford. In 1994 she moved to England to an academic appointment at the Law Faculty of the University of Bristol, continuing part-time practice. From 1999 to 2013 she held a Tutorial Fellowship at Wadham College and a CUF Lectureship at the Faculty of Law, Oxford University. In October 2013 her Wadham post was converted to a Senior Research Fellowship to allow her to concentrate on her research in criminal justice and human rights, in particular the intersection between the law of evidence and human rights, as well as tort and medical law. She continues with her usual Faculty duties, as a University Lecturer (ULNTF), lecturing in Tort Law, Evidence Law and Medical Law & Ethics.  See further below under Research Interests.

In 2009 Laura was elected as a Fellow of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, where she serves on the Equality & Diversity Committee, and she is a door tenant at a leading criminal barristers' set in London, Red Lion Chambers. She has conducted empirical research for the Crown Prosecution Service and the Home Office on prosecutorial decision making and on child abuse prosecutions. She chairs the Independent Advisory Committee on Child Maltreatment convened by Action for Children, which drafted a new offence of child maltreatment which is currently before Parliament. She also provides advice on law reform to the NSPCC and works with the Children's Rights Alliance and Just For Kids Law on strategic litgation to further children's rights, especially in the criminal justice system. In December 2012 she was invited by the Verma Committee on Amendments to the Criminal Law, appointed as a consequence of  the furore sparked by a gang rape and murder in December 2012, to advise them on reform of substantive sexual assault offences for adults, children and other vulnerable persons, and a range of issues pertaining to more effective trials of such offences, including special measures for vulnerable witnesses, her contribution being acknowledged in the Report and in the national press conference held by Chief Justice Verma. She has recently been consulted by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabularies and the NSPCC with regard to their enquiries into the investigation of sexual abuse allegations against Jimmy Savile and legal and practice responses to the issues raised. She is also frequently consulted by the Ministry of Justice, the Crown Prosecution Service and the Criminal Bar Association on a range of issues relating to child abuse and exploitation prosecutions, and the intersection of criminal justice and human rights more generally.



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Carolyn Hoyle
Professor of Criminology

Centre for Criminology & Green Templeton College

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminology

Research interests: Criminal Justice, Criminology, wrongful convictions, death penalty

Professor Carolyn Hoyle is Director of the Centre for Criminology. She has been at the University of Oxford Centre for Criminology since 1991 and has published empirical and theoretical research on a number of criminological topics including domestic violence, policing, restorative justice, the death penalty, and, latterly wrongful convictions. She teaches courses on the MSc in Criminology & Criminal Justice on: 'Restorative Justice'; 'The Death Penalty'; and 'Victims', lectures on Victims and Restorative Justice on the FHS Law degree, and supervises DPhil, MPhil and MSc students on these and other criminological topics. She is currently conducting research into applications to the Criminal Cases Review Commission concerning alleged miscarriages of justice, as well as continuing her ongoing research on the death penalty.



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Emily Hudson
CDF in IP Law

St Peter's College

Teaches: Intellectual Property

Research interests: Intellectual property law; personal property law

Emily Hudson joined the University of Oxford in January 2012 as Career Development Fellow in Intellectual Property Law (associated with St Peter’s College). She is an Academic Member of the Oxford Intellectual Property Research Centre, Chair of the Oxford International Intellectual Property Moot, and has served as the OIPRC's Acting Director. In addition to her work in intellectual property law, Emily also researches in personal property law and law as it relates to cultural institutions and the arts.

She has previously worked for the University of Queensland (Lecturer and Director of Mooting Programs) and the University of Melbourne (Research Fellow, CMCL and IPRIA), and for three years was a solicitor at Minter Ellison Lawyers. She now maintains an association with the University of Queensland through a fractional appointment as a Senior Lecturer.

Emily holds a BSc(Hons), LLB(Hons), LLM and PhD from the University of Melbourne. Her doctoral thesis used empirical techniques to analyse how cultural institutions in the US, Canada and Australia understand and apply exceptions to copyright infringement. Emily's thesis has won two prizes at the University of Melbourne: the Harold Luntz Graduate Research Thesis Prize, and the Chancellor's Prize for Excellence in the PhD Thesis. A book based on her thesis will be published by Cambridge University Press.

In 2000, Emily was a member of the University of Melbourne team that won the international rounds of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.



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Murray Hunt
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty


Murray Hunt is a Visiting Professor from 1st January 2011, working on the AHRC funded research project on 'Parliaments and Human Rights'. He is currently Legal Advisor to the UK Parliament's Joint Committee on Human Rights. He was a key founding member of Matrix Chambers, London and has specialised in human rights law and public law.



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Miles Jackson
Global Justice Research Fellow

St Anne's College & Centre for Criminology

Research interests: International Criminal Law, Public International Law, Comparative Constitutional Law, Human Rights Law

MA, DPhil (Oxford); LL.M. (Harvard). Miles is the Global Justice Research Fellow at St Anne's College and convenor of the Oxford Transitional Justice Research Group. His doctoral research, supported by a Rhodes Scholarship, was on complicity in international law. He teaches Criminal Justice and Human Rights for the faculty.

Miles is a former clerk of the Constitutional Court of South Africa and a former chair of Oxford Pro Bono Publico.



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Mark Janis
Visiting Fellow

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: Public International Law

Mark Janis is a Visiting Fellow at the Law Faculty and a Fellow Commoner at The Queen's College, where he studied law as a Rhodes scholar. He has also been Reader in Law for the Faculty and a Law Fellow at Exeter College. He is William F. Starr Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law where he teaches International Law and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He has written a number of scholarly articles and several books including The American Tradition of International Law (OUP 2004), International Law (Aspen 5th ed. 2008), International Law Cases and Commentary (with J.E. Noyes, West 3d ed. 2006), and European Human Rights Law (with R.S. Kay & A.W. Bradley, OUP 3rd ed. 2008).



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Valentin Jeutner
Stipendiary Lecturer in Law

Pembroke College




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Angus Johnston
Professor of Law

University College & Centre for Competition Law & Policy

Teaches: European Union Law, Competition Law, European Business Regulation, Comparative Private Law

Research interests: EU Law, Energy Law, Competition Law, Tort Law, Comparative Law

Angus Johnston is (as of August 2014) Professor of Law and a Fellow in Law at University College, where he arrived in September 2010 as Senior Law Fellow and CUF Lecturer.

He read for the B.A. (Law with Law Studies in Europe) and the B.C.L. at Brasenose College and was elected to the Vinerian Scholarship in 1999. He read for the LL.M. in European Union Law and was also Lecturer at the Institute for Anglo-American Law at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands in 1997-8.

He was a Fellow and Director of Studies in Law at Trinity Hall, Cambridge (from 1999) and University Lecturer (from 2004) and then Senior Lecturer at Cambridge University (from 2008) until his appointment to Oxford. He has been a visitor to Harvard Law School and the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law in Hamburg; he was also an affiliated lecturer at Cambridge University and at the Jacobs University, Bremen until 2012-13, and is a regular contributor to the Florence School of Regulation (at the EUI) Summer School on EU Energy Law.



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Aileen Kavanagh
Associate Professor of Law

St Edmund Hall

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: constitutional and administrative law, human rights and constitutional theory

Aileen Kavanagh, BCL, MA (University College Dublin); MLE (Hanover); DPhil (Oxon), is an Associate Professor of Law and a Fellow of St Edmund Hall. She teaches and researches in the areas of constitutional and administrative law, human rights and constitutional theory. After completing her DPhil in constitutional theory at Balliol College, Oxford, she was a Lecturer in Law (2000-06) and Reader (2006-9) at the University of Leicester. She is on the editorial board of Law and Philosophy and Jurisprudence: An International Journal of Law and Philosophy. Recent publications include her book Constitutional Review under the UK Human Rights Act 1998 (CUP, 2009). Her current research focuses on constitutionalism and counter-terrorism, the doctrine of proportionality, and the separation of powers.



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Jane Kaye
Director of the Centre for Law, Health and Emerging Technologies at Oxford: HeLEX

HeLEX: Centre for Health, Law and Emerging Technologies

Teaches: Medical Law and Ethics

Research interests: Socio-legal research; regulation; medical law; privacy and data protection; European community law.

Jane Kaye is Director of the Centre for Law, Health and Emerging Technologies at Oxford: (HeLEX) based in the Department of Public Health at the University of Oxford. She obtained her degrees from the Australian National University (BA); University of Melbourne (LLB); and University of Oxford (DPhil). She was admitted to practice as a solicitor/barrister in 1997. She is advisor to a number of F7 projects and on the Sample and Ethics Committee of the 1000 Genomes Project; International Scientific Advisory Board Canadians for Tomorrow Project; UK10K Ethics Advisory Group and Chair of the CARTaGENE International Scientific Advisory Board, Canada. She is also on the editorial boards of Law, Innovation and Technology, Journal of Law and Information Science, and Genomics, Policy and Society.

Her research involves investigating the relationships between law, ethics, and practice in the area of emerging technologies in health. The main focus is on genomics with an emphasis on biobanks, privacy, data-sharing frameworks, global governance and translational research. Her full profile is available at http://helex.medsci.ox.ac.uk/



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Ciara Kennefick
Career Development Fellow in Law

The Queen's College


Dr Ciara Kennefick is Career Development Fellow in Law at The Queen’s College. As an undergraduate, she studied law and French literature at University College Cork, the University of California, Berkeley and Université Montpellier I. She then read for the BCL, MPhil and DPhil at Oxford.

Before taking up her fellowship at Queen’s in September 2013, Ciara was a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Pembroke College. In 2013/ 2014, she is also an invited lecturer at Université Paris II (Panthéon-Assas).



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Tarunabh Khaitan
Associate Professor of Law

Wadham College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Public Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law, Discrimination Law

Tarun Khaitan is an Associate Professor and the Hackney Fellow in Law at Wadham College. He completed his undergraduate studies (BA LLB Hons) at the National Law School (Bangalore) between 1999-2004. He then came to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and completed his postgraduate studies (BCL with distinction, MPhil with distinction, DPhil) at Exeter College. Before joining Wadham, he was the Penningtons Student in Law at Christ Church. 

Tarun is currently working on a monograph entitled 'A Theory of Discrimination Law'.



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Dori Kimel
Reader in Legal Philosophy

New College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: jurisprudence, moral & political philosophy, criminal law and contract law

Dori Kimel is Fellow and Senior Law Tutor at New College. Having completed his D.Phil he took up a lectureship at University College London, then returned to Oxford to take up a Fellowship at New College in 2001. His teaching and research interests are in legal, moral and political philosophy, criminal law, and contract law theory. Amongst his publications is the book From Promise to Contract: Towards a Liberal Theory of Contract (Oxford 2003).



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Maris Köpcke Tinturé
Fellow and Tutor in Law, Worcester College & Lecturer in Law, Brasenose College

Worcester College & Brasenose College

Teaches: Criminal Law

Research interests: Philosophy of Law, Criminal Law, Criminal Law Theory, Roman Law, Comparative Private Law

Maris Köpcke Tinturé teaches and writes in jurisprudence and criminal law. In 2009 she completed a D.Phil. at University College Oxford on the moral purpose of legal validity, supervised by Prof. John Finnis and Prof. John Gardner. It won the 2011 European Award for Legal Theory, and will be published as a book in 2014. Maris is interested in legal philosophy, criminal law and criminal law theory. She also has interests in Roman law and in comparative private law. She has given a number of invited talks at European and American universities.

Prior to coming to Oxford, Maris studied Law at ESADE (Barcelona), and read for LL.M.s at the European Academy of Legal Theory (Brussels) and Harvard Law School (Cambridge, MA).



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Beatrice Krebs
Lecturer

St Hilda's College

Teaches: Contract, Tort, Criminal Law

Beatrice Krebs studied law at the University of Münster, graduating in 2004 with the First State Exam (Erstes Juristisches Staatsexamen). In 2007, she obtained a BA in Jurisprudence from the University of Oxford, followed by an LL.M. from Columbia Law School, New York, in 2008 (Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar).

Before taking up her current position at St Hilda?s, she was Graduate Lecturer in Law at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. She is also a Visiting Lecturer at Bucerius Law School, Hamburg.

Her doctoral thesis, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, focuses on homicide and joint criminal enterprise liability in English and German law. Her research interests include white collar crime and comparative and international criminal law. At St Hilda's, she teaches criminal law, tort and contract.



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Thomas Krebs
Associate Professor of Commercial Law

Brasenose College

Teaches: Commercial Law, International Trade, Tort, Contract

Research interests: Commercial Law



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Jaakko Kuosmanen
James Martin Programme Coordinator, Oxford Martin School Programme on the Human Right for Future Generations

Oxford Law Faculty & Pembroke College


Dr Jaakko Kuosmanen is the Co-ordinator of the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations and a Research Fellow at the Law Faculty. Jaakko received his PhD at the University of Edinburgh in 2012. He has lectured on human rights law, global justice, institutionalism, and just war theory, and has worked for the Office of the Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe. Jaakko's current research focuses on human rights budget analysis and the design of long-term oriented governing institutions.



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Marina Kurkchiyan
Foundation for Law, Justice and Society Research Fellow

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & Wolfson College


Marina Kurkchiyan joined the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies in 1999 as the Peter North Fellow and Research Fellow of Keble College. In 2001 she was appointed Centre Research Fellow. From 2003 she was Paul Dodyk Fellow and Research Fellow of Wolfson College and took up her present position in 2007.

Dr Kurkchiyan is a sociologist who specialises in legal culture and the impact of public policy on social structure and human behaviour. She has conducted research in many countries including Ukraine, Russia and the regions bordering on the Black Sea and the Caspian. As a consultant to the World Bank, the DfID, the Open Society Institute and the UNDP she has completed a number of official reports on the interaction between law and society in relation to development. Her academic papers have appeared in several languages and have dealt with the socio-legal aspects of education, poverty relief, the informal economy, respect for law and health care. Her current research examines the transplanting of legal institutions from the West into Post-Communist societies, particularly the efforts made in Russia since 2000 to create voluntary councils for media outlets that would enable newspapers, TV and radio to regulate themselves and thereby avoid censorship, litigation and intimidation.



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Grant Lamond
University Lecturer in Legal Philosophy

A University Lecturership is a tenured (or tenure-track) position involving teaching and research duties for the University. A College Tutorial Fellowship is often held jointly with the University Lecturership. University Lecturers have greater University obligations and lighter College obligations than CUF Lecturers.

Balliol College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Criminal Law, Jurisprudence

Grant Lamond is University Lecturer in Legal Philosophy and the Felix Frankfurter Fellow in Law, Balliol College. He holds degrees in Philosophy and Law from the University of Sydney and took the BCL at Magdalen College. He was a Junior Research Fellow at St Edmund Hall, where he completed his DPhil. His research interests lie in the philosophy of law and the philosophy of criminal law.



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Bettina Lange
Associate Professor of Law and Regulation

Wolfson College

Teaches: Environmental Law, Regulation

Research interests: EU, UK and German environmental regulation Qualitative empirical socio-legal research methods, including discourse analysis The application of new modes of European governance to education policies Socio-legal theories of regulation, including the role of emotions in regulatory processes

Bettina Lange joined the Law Faculty and Wolfson College in July 2007, having previously worked in the law departments of Aberystwyth and Keele University, UK. She trained in law and sociology at Warwick University, UK and before that studied for two years law at the Justus-Liebig Universität, Giessen, Germany. Her research examines legal regulation from a socio-legal perspective. She is currently working on a project on the invocation of emotion discourses in the legal regulation of genetically modified organisms in UK agriculture. This project investigates the role that appeals to emotions play in the administrative legal decision-making procedure about the release of GMOs into the environment under UK and EU law. She also works together with Prof. Nafsika Alexiadou (Umea University, Sweden) on a research project which examines different styles of policy learning in open methods of co-ordination as applied to education policies in the European Union. This project examines how the European Union seeks to enhance its governance capacity in relation to education policies in the EU through soft regulatory tools, such as policy learning. Bettina was a Jean-Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute, Florence, Italy from September 2004 to January 2005. She  has conducted consultancy for the Environment Agency in England and Wales and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Centre for Environmental Law of Landmark Chambers. Her core research interests are - EU, UK and German environmental regulation - Qualitative empirical socio-legal research methods, including discourse analysis - The application of new modes of European governance to education policies - Socio-legal theories of regulation, including the role of emotions in regulatory processes. Her research has been funded by the British Academy, the ESRC, the SLSA and the John-Fell Fund. She serves on the editorial board of  Law and Policy, the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies and the European Journal of Risk Regulation.



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Liora Lazarus
Associate Professor of Law

St Anne's College & Centre for Criminology

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Criminology and Criminal Justice, Human Rights Law

Research interests: Criminal justice, human rights, security, comparative method, prisoners' rights, comparative constitutional culture, South African constitutional culture; German constitutional law and culture; UK human rights and constitutional law

Liora Lazarus, BA (UCT), LLB (LSE), DPhil (Oxon), is an Associate Professor in Law, Member of the Centre for Criminological Research, and Fellow of St. Anne's College. Her primary research interests are in comparative human rights, security and human rights, comparative theory and comparative criminal justice.

Born and raised in South Africa, she studied African Economic History at the University of Cape Town and Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science. From 1994-95 she was a Fellow of the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg, Germany. She came to Oxford in 1995 to write her doctorate at Balliol College, after which she went on to become a law fellow at St Anne's College. She is the author of a number of academic books, chapters and articles on prisoners' rights, criminal justice and security and human rights. She has also completed a number of public reports on various aspects of human rights for the UK Ministry of Justice, The UK Stern Review into the treatment of Rape Complaints, and the European Union Parliament. 

Liora is an Associate Director of the Oxford Human Rights Hub, and is actively involved in the work of Oxford Pro Bono Publico (which she co-founded) and the Oxford Transitional Justice Research Group. She is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Gilbert and Tobin Centre for Public Law at UNSW, Sydney; a research associate at Faculty of Law, University of Cape Town, and an Associate Member of the Institute of Cultural Inquiry in Berlin. Liora is the book review editor of the European Human Rights Law Review, and sits on the editorial board of the Journal of Human Rights Practice. She is also on the Advisory Board of Oxford's Centre for Ethics and Law in Armed Conflict.

Currently, Liora has just completed an edited collection entitled Reasoning Rights.  She has just come to the end of of a British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship which commenced in October 2012. This has enabled her to undertake research towards the completion of two monographs entitled Securing Legality and Juridifying Security.  The completion of this work will continue to be funded by the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights For Future Generations.

The influence of her research in the public sphere was recently explored in an Oxford Impact Video on her work.



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Ed Leahy
Visiting Lecturer

Oxford Law Faculty

Research interests: The future of the practice of law

Ed Leahy has lectured regularly at Oxford since 1998 and joined the Law Faculty in 2011. He has taught in the areas of securities law, cyberlaw, the law of international telecommunications, conflicts of laws and US litigation and international dispute resolution and he has published extensively in these and other areas. He has been a partner in major New York and Washington law firms where he represented clients in the areas of US and international litigation and arbitration, international transactions and internal investigations. He was the co-founder and Managing Partner of the investment bank, AEG Capital LLC. He is a former law clerk to Justice William J. Brennan of the United States Supreme Court. From 1996-98, he was the Distinguished Scholar from Practice and Visiting Professor at Boston College Law School, where he received the Most Outstanding Faculty Member Award. He is a former Sir Maurice Shock Visiting Fellow at University College (2003). His particular research interest is the future of the practice of law.



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Ambrose Lee
Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow

Centre for Criminology

Teaches: Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Primarily political philosophy (especially theories of distributive justice) and philosophy of law; secondarily metaethics and moral philosophy.

Ambrose Lee is a political and legal philosopher, currently holding a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship at the Centre for Criminology, to undertake a 3 year research project titled 'Internal Constraints to Coercive Harm Prevention'. This project builds on the AHRC-funded 'Preventive Justice' Project, which Ambrose worked with Professors Andrew Ashworth and Lucia Zedner as a research officer. The aim of the 'Preventive Justice' Project was to develop an account of the principles and values that should guide and limit the state’s use of coercive techniques in the prevention of harms, in particular its criminal law and other similar instruments. Building on this, Ambrose's current project investigates the rationale(s) behind why the state should prevent harms in the first place. Once this is identified, constraints on the state's use of coercive techniques to prevent harms can then be derived, by asking whether those coercive techniques contradict or undermine the rationale(s). The resulting set of constraints to coercive harm prevention would then be internal to the preventive rationale, which have to be accepted on pain of contradicting or undermining it, as opposed to constraints external to the preventive rationale that are more prevalent in contemporary literature.

Before he joined the Law Faculty and the Centre for Criminology, Ambrose was a lecturer in metaethics in the Division of Law and Philosophy at University of Stirling. He obtained his doctorate from the same university in 2011, with a thesis titled 'Duties of Minimal Wellbeing and Their Role in Global Justice'.

Besides political and legal philosophy, Ambrose also has a keen interest in metaethics and moral philosophy. More specifically, he is interested in the following issues: theories of distributive justice (both domestic and global), value incommensurability, the nature of goodness, the nature of respect, justification of legal punishment, the nature of law, criteria for criminalization, the nature of wellbeing, and its relationship with morality.



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Philip Lewis
Associate Research Fellow, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & All Souls College

Research interests: Socio-legal Studies



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Ian Loader
Professor of Criminology

Centre for Criminology & All Souls College

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminology

Research interests: Policing and security; penal policy and culture; public sensibilities towards crime, order and justice; crime control and democratic politics; criminology and social and political theory.

Ian Loader is Professor of Criminology and Professorial Fellow of All Souls College.  Ian arrived in Oxford in July 2005 having previously taught at Keele University and the University of Edinburgh, from where he also obtained his PhD in 1993. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.

Ian is the author of six books, the most recent of which Public Criminology? was published by Routledge in 2010 (with R. Sparks) and has recently been translated into Mandarin. He has also edited two recent volumes (on Emotions, Crime and Justice and The Penal Landscape) and has published theoretical and empirical papers on policing, private security, public sensibilities towards crime, penal policy and culture, the politics of crime control, and the public roles of criminology.

Ian is currently working on a project – termed ‘A Better Politics of Crime’ - concerned with different dimensions of the relationship between crime control and democratic politics. The first strand of work on this project was brought together in Public Criminology? The next key stage will be a monograph (co-authored with Richard Sparks) with the working title of Crime Control and Political Ideologies which is in the early stages of preparation. The project also includes a forthcoming co-edited volume on Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration (with Albert Dzur and Richard Sparks, Oxford UP) and a book on Justice and Penal Policy that arises from his involvement with the Howard League’s symposium on ‘What is Justice?’ (co-edited with Barry Goldson and Steve Farrall).

Ian is also co-editing the SAGE Handbook of Global Policing (with Ben Bradford, Bea Jauregui and Jonny Steinberg) which is due to appear in late 2015.

Ian is an Associate Editor of Theoretical Criminology and is on the Editorial Boards of Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice and IPS: International Political Sociology. From 2005-2013 he was on the Editorial board of the British Journal of Criminology.

Ian was a member of the Commission on English Prisons Today from 2007-2009, and now chairs the Research Advisory Group of the Howard League for Penal Reform. He is co-convener, with the Police Foundation, of the Oxford Policing Policy Forum and is an Associate Fellow of the Institute for Public Policy Research. From 2011-2013 Ian was a member of the Independent Commission on the Future of Policing and part of the Editorial team which produced the Commission's Report. From time to time he writes columns for The Guardian and makes other contributions to public debate about crime and justice.

Ian's Google Scholar profile



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Glen Loutzenhiser
Associate Professor of Tax Law

St Hugh's College

Teaches: Taxation

Research interests: Corporate Tax, Employment Tax with a particular emphasis on employee share schemes, Tax and the Family, International Tax, Environmental Taxation

Glen Loutzenhiser, BComm (Sask), LLB (Toronto), LLM (Cantab), MA (Oxon), DPhil (Oxon) is Associate Professor of Tax Law and Tutorial Fellow of St Hugh's College. Glen previously worked as a solicitor in the corporate tax department of the Toronto law firm Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP, and as an accountant in public practice and industry. Glen is qualified as a barrister & solicitor in Canada. He teaches undergraduate courses on EU Law and Taxation Law and on the BCL/MJur Corporate Tax Law and Policy course and the Personal Taxation course.



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Catherine MacKenzie
Fellow at the Environmental Change Institute

Green Templeton College

Teaches: Public International Law


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Mavis Maclean
Senior Research Fellow, Department of Social Policy

Barnet House

Research interests: Family Law, especially divorce and children



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Mike Macnair
Associate Professor of Law

St Hugh's College

Teaches: Civil Procedure, Land Law, Legal History, Roman Law, Tort

Research interests: Land Law, Tort, Legal History

Mike Macnair is Tutor in Law at St Hugh's College. Teaching Fields: History of English Law, Roman Law, Land Law, Torts



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Viktor Mayer-Schönberger
Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation

Oxford Internet Institute & Keble College


Viktor Mayer-Schönberger is the Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford. His research focuses on the role of information in a networked economy. Earlier he spent ten years on the faculty of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Professor Mayer-Schönberger has published seven books, as well as over a hundred articles (including in Science) and book chapters. His most recent book, the awards-winning 'Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age' (Princeton University Press 2009) has received favorable reviews by academic (Nature, Science, New Scientist) and mainstream media (New York Times, Guardian, Le Monde, NPR, BBC, Wired) and has been published in four languages. Ideas proposed in the book have now become official policy, e.g. of the European Union. A native Austrian, Professor Mayer-Schönberger founded Ikarus Software in 1986, a company focusing on data security, and developed Virus Utilities, which became the best-selling Austrian software product. He was voted Top-5 Software Entrepreneur in Austria in 1991 and Person-of-the-Year for the State of Salzburg in 2000. He chaired the Rueschlikon Conference on Information Policy, is the cofounder of the SubTech conference series, and served on the ABA/AALS National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. He is on the advisory boards of corporations and organizations around the world, including Microsoft and the World Economic Forum. He is a personal adviser to the Austrian Finance Minister on innovation policy. He holds a number of law degrees, including one from Harvard and an MS(Econ) from the London School of Economics, and while in high school won national awards for his programming and the Physics Olympics of his home state. In his spare time, he likes to travel, go to the movies, and learn about architecture.



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Doreen McBarnet
Professor of Socio-Legal Studies

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & Wolfson College

Research interests: Socio-legal Studies, Corporate Finance, Taxation, Business Regulation

MA (hons) History and Sociology,Glasgow University, PhD, Glasgow University,CBE



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Christopher McCrudden
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty


Christopher McCrudden received his legal education in Belfast (LL.B.), Yale University (LL.M.), and Oxford (D.Phil.). He is currently Professor of Human Rights and Equality Law at Queen?s University Belfast and a Fellow of the British Academy. He was formerly Professor of Human Rights Law at the University of Oxford and is now a Visiting Professor here at Oxford.



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Ewan McKendrick
Registrar

Lady Margaret Hall

Teaches: Commercial Law, Contract, International Trade, Restitution

Research interests: Commercial Law, Contract, International Trade, Restitution

Ewan McKendrick, BCL, MA, LLB (Edinburgh), Barrister of Gray's Inn is Registrar of the University of Oxford, Professor of English Private Law, Fellow of Lady Margaret Hall.

Formerly: Professor of English Law, University College London, 1995-2000; Fellow of St Anne's College, Oxford and Linnells Lecturer in Law in the University of Oxford, 1991-1995; Lecturer in Law, London School of Economics and Political Science, 1988-1991; Lecturer in Law, University of Essex,1985-1988; Lecturer in Law, University of Central Lancashire, 1984-1985.

He is a member of the Edtorial Board of the Journal of International Banking and Regulation Law. He is a member of Chambers at 3 Verulam Buildings, Gray's Inn.



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Andrew McLeod
Research Fellow

St John's College & Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Contract, Roman Law, Trusts

Research interests: Constitutional Law; Equity; Legal History; Comparative Law

Andrew McLeod is a Research Fellow within the Faculty and serves as Programme Director of the Oxford—Myanmar Law Programme. He holds first-class honours degrees in law and chemistry from the University of Sydney and read for the BCL at Exeter College, Oxford.

Before coming to Oxford, Andrew was Lecturer in Constitutional Law at the University of Sydney and special advisor to the H C Coombs Policy Forum, a think tank established by the Australian Government at the Australian National University's Crawford School of Public Policy. He served as associate to the Chief Justice of Australia and has worked as a senior analyst and speechwriter within the Australian Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Andrew’s research interests lie in constitutional law, equity and legal history. He has particular expertise in executive power and constitutional transitions and has advised on constitutional reform processes in Africa and Asia. For the past two years, he has supported the constitutional review underway in Myanmar.

Andrew serves on the editorial boards of the Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal and the Australian Bar Review and previously served as Book Review Editor for the Sydney Law Review.



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Sandra Meredith
Departmental Lecturer in Legal Research Skills

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Legal Research Method

Sandra Meredith teaches effective use of legal information resources and research technologies. She is the Co-ordinator of the undergraduate course in Research Skills & Mooting, and supports the postgraduate Course in Legal Research Methods. Sandy is co-editor of OSCOLA and developer of OSCOLA styles for bibliographic software, particularly EndNote; the Faculty's Weblearn and SSRN administrator; and she is responsible for the Faculty's Preparation in Teaching and Learning at Oxford (PLTO) course for new tutors. Before joining the Law Faculty in 2002, Sandy worked as a Learning Technology Support Officer at Oxford Brookes, and before that she was an Educational Developer in Graduate Studies in the School of Nursing at LaTrobe University in Melbourne, Australia. She has an MA in Education.



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Caroline Miles

Centre for Criminology

Research interests: Family violence; homicide; the relationship between alcohol/drugs and violence/homicide; suicide and mental illness.

Caroline Miles is a Research Officer in the Centre for Criminology, working with Dr Rachel Condry on an ESRC-funded project investigating adolescent violence towards parents. She was previously a Lecturer in Criminology and Programme leader for the MA Crime and Justice at the University of Chester, having completed her ESRC-funded PhD at the University of Manchester in 2008. Caroline’s thesis examined substance-related homicide (involving intoxication or systemic circumstances) in England and Wales; drawing upon data from the Homicide Index, police files for solved homicide cases and interviews with convicted homicide offenders.

Prior to her PhD Caroline worked as a Research Assistant for the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness and as a Resettlement Officer for Nacro. She obtained her LLB Honours (first class) degree in Law and Criminology and ESRC-funded MA in Criminology and Research Methods (distinction) from Keele University.



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Peter Mirfield
Professor of the Law of Evidence

Jesus College

Teaches: Contract, Criminal Law, Evidence, Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Evidence, Criminal Procedure, Criminal Law

Peter Mirfield, BCL 1972, MA 1976, Oxon, Barrister 1973, Kennedy Law Schol 1973. Fellow 1981 CUF Lect 1981 Formerly: Lecturer, Leeds, 1976-81. Visiting Professor, Florida State University, 1987-88, 1995, 1999. Visiting Professor, Santa Clara University, 1997, 2000.



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Rodrigo Momberg Uribe
Career Development Fellow in Comparative Law

Oxford Law Faculty & Brasenose College

Teaches: Comparative Private Law, European Union Law, Roman Law

Research interests: Comparative Private Law, Contract Law, Consumer Law

Dr Rodrigo Momberg Uribe graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Law with Honours from the Universidad Austral of Chile and afterwards he was admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Chile. Since then he has worked as an attorney at law and a legal adviser, mainly in Civil and Commercial Law before the Chilean courts. In 2002 he received a Master of Laws in European Private Law from Utrecht University.

From 2002 onwards he has been an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law of the Universidad Austral of Chile and from July 2005 until February 2008 he was appointed as Secretary General of the same University.

In 2007 he was awarded with the Prince Bernhard Scholarship by the Foundation "The Spanish, Portuguese and Ibero-American Institute". On February 2008 he joined the Molengraaff Institute of Private Law at Utrecht University as a PhD researcher and in May 2011 he defended his doctoral thesis on "The effect of a change of circumstances on the binding force of contracts". In 2011 he received the first prize in the Clive M. Schmitthoff Essay Competition, awarded by the Pace Law School’s Institute of Commercial International Commercial Law together with Queen Mary University of London’s Centre for Commercial Law Studies. Rodrigo Momberg has published in the field of consumer, contract and European private law.

Dr Momberg Uribe is also a Supernumerary Fellow in Law at Brasenose College, Oxford.



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Gabriel Moss
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Corporate Insolvency Law

Research interests: Insolvency law

University Education:          

BA (Jurisprudence) (First Class Honours) 1971

BCL 1972

 

Scholarships:

  • Honorary Scholar of St. Catherine’s College
  • Hardwicke and Cassel Scholarships, Lincoln’s Inn
  • Eldon Scholarship 1975, Oxford University

 

University Teaching and Lectures/Seminars:

Full time Lecturer in Law at the University of Connecticut Law School 1972-1973.

Subsequently, whilst starting at the Bar, “weekending” at St Edmund Hall and St. Catherine’s Colleges.  Also part time teaching at the London School of Economics and the Council of Legal Education (the Bar School).

In recent years, occasional university lectures and seminars at the Brooklyn Law School in Brooklyn and at the Summer School at the University of Bologna, NYU with simultaneous internet relay to Tulane and Utah law schools, the University of Leiden (LLM level) and the University of Cologne (for professors, graduates and legal practitioners).

 

Other lecturing and teaching:

Invited by the Chancellor of the Chancery Division to lecture the Chancery Judges and Registrars on the effect of the EC Regulation on Insolvency Proceedings (1346/2000).

Numerous lectures to international and domestic conferences dealing with insolvency law, such as those run by the International Insolvency Institute, INSOL Europe and R3. Venues include not only the UK but also Barcelona, Berlin, Amsterdam, Paris, Rome, New York, Vienna, Prague, Venice and Malaga.

Number of talks on insolvency law for the European Academy of Law in Trier, which is backed by the EU, for judges, lawyers and academics in the EU and adjoining countries.

Speaker at Seminars organised by Oxford University on fixed and floating charges, intermediated securities and a comparative discussion of French and English insolvency law. 

Advised the European Parliament, Legal Affairs Committee, on the draft European Insolvency Convention as one of the four EU insolvency law experts invited.  The deliberations of the committee led to the passing of the EC Regulation on Insolvency Proceedings (1346/2000).

Nature of practice:

Practising barrister specialising in business and financial law and in particular reorganisation and insolvency related cases, including EU and other international aspects.

Involved in major “cutting edge” or “frontier” areas of insolvency law.  For example, researched the 18th and 19th Century case law relating to the “anti-deprivation” principle and developed a successful argument for an exception to the doctrine based on the old cases in the Court of Appeal in the Perpetual/Belmont case.  Another example is the invention, with a colleague, of the “head office functions test” in relation to the interpretation of Article 3 of the EC Regulation on Insolvency Proceedings (1346/2000), a test approved by the Advocate General in the Eurofood case in the ECJ and followed by national courts in the UK, France, Germany and Hungary and much discussed in the literature in the UK and EU.  The test was in effect adopted by the ECJ in the Interedil case.

 

Legislation:

  • Member of the Financial Markets Law Committee of the Bank of England and
  • Member of the Bank of England Working Groups on (i) Property Investments in Investment Securities, (ii) Building Society and Incorporated Friendly Society Set-Off and (iii) Financial Collateral, considering legal uncertainty affecting the Capital Markets and proposals for dealing with such legal uncertainty.
  • Member of the Review Panel formed by the UK Insolvency Service to assist in considering changes to English law and practice in the light of the EC Insolvency Regulation (1346/2000), which led to a number of changes to English insolvency law.
  • Member of the Review Panel set up by the Insolvency Lawyers Association to consider the enactment of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-frontier Insolvency Proceedings in Great Britain and the proposed extension of the Model Law to banks and insurers.  The legislation enacting the Model Law in Great Britain reflected some of the recommendations made.
  • Other significant committee memberships relating to legal reforms include the Insolvency Law Sub Committee of the Consumer and Commercial Law Committee of the Law Society and the Insolvency Committee of Justice, the British section of the International Commission of Jurists.
  • Advised the Treasury in relation to implementation of the Directive on the Reorganisation and Winding Up of Insurance Undertakings and the FSA in relation to the implementation of the UCITS Directive as well as new legislation to cope with  massive financial insolvencies such as Lehmans.

 

Journals:

Chairman of the editorial board and frequent contributor to Insolvency Intelligence, a leading refereed journal of insolvency law and to other legal journals.

 

Judicial role:

Authorised by the Law Chancellor to sit as a Deputy High Court Judge since 2001.  Several reported judgments involved considerable research and analysis of the legal position.  For example Macepark v Sargeant [2004] 3AER 1090 (incidental use of rights of way) involved reconciling a number of authorities including those in the Court of Appeal.  Nexus Communications v Lambert, Times, 3 March 2005 explores the doctrine of election.  Tamares v Fairpoint [2007] 1 WLR 2148, 2167 is the leading case on damages in lieu of injunction in the case of an infringement to rights to light.  Internet Broadcasting Corp Limited v Marr LLC [2009] 2 Lloyd’s Reports 295 is a significant case dealing with exclusion clauses and fundamental breach where the breach is deliberate.  Enviroco Limited v Farstad Supply is now a leading case on the interpretation of the Companies Acts’ definition of “subsidiary” and has just recently appeared in the Supreme Court.

 

 

Expert evidence:

Written expert evidence in relation to English, Bermudan, Cayman and Guernsey law in foreign courts and arbitral tribunals including US, Australia, Greece, Iceland, Italy and Poland. Oral evidence before the Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of new York.

 

Selected Other Roles

Member of the Supervisory Board of the Academic Forum of Insol Europe and delivered papers and lectures for the Academic Forum at its meetings

International Advisor to the American Law Institute/International Insolvency Institute project on Transnational Insolvency: Principles of Co-Operation



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Donal Nolan
Associate Professor of Law

Worcester College

Teaches: Contract, International Trade, Tort

Research interests: Contract, Tort

Donal Nolan is the Porjes Foundation Fellow and Tutor in Law at Worcester College, Oxford, and an Associate Professor of Law in the University of Oxford. He was educated at Brasenose College, Oxford (BA and BCL) and was previously a Lecturer in Law at King's College London. He has taught tort, contract, international trade law, restitution and commercial law, and has been a Visiting Professor in the Universities of Florida and Trento. He is currently a Senior Fellow of the University of Melbourne. Donal's research interests lie in tort and contract, and he has published on a range of topics in these areas, including nuisance, liability for psychiatric injury, public authority liability, privity of contract and estoppel. Recent publications include 'Offer and Acceptance in the Electronic Age' in Burrows and Peel (eds), Contract Formation and Parties (OUP, 2010); 'The Page v Smith Saga: A Tale of Inauspicious Origins and Unintended Consequences' [2010] CLJ 495 (with Stephen Bailey); 'The Liability of Public Authorities for Failing to Confer Benefits' (2011) 127 LQR 260; 'Nuisance' in Hoffman (ed), The Impact of the UK Human Rights Act on Private Law (CUP, 2011); and 'The Fatal Accidents Act 1846' in Arvind and Steele (eds), Tort Law and the Legislature: Common Law, Statute and the Dynamics of Legal Change (Hart, 2012). He is the author of the chapters on government liability, product liability, nuisance and Rylands v Fletcher and fire in Oliphant (ed), The Law of Tort (Butterworths, 2nd edn, 2007); the chapters on strict liability and the principle of Rylands v Fletcher in Sappideen and Vines (eds), Fleming's The Law of Torts (Thomson Reuters (Professional) Australia, 10th edn, 2011); and the co-editor of Rights and Private Law (Hart, 2012), to which he contributed two chapters, 'Rights and Private Law' (with Andrew Robertson) and '"A Tort Against Land": Private Nuisance as a Property Tort' . Donal is also the co-editor of OSCOLA, the Oxford University Standard for Citation of Legal Authorities (www.law.ox.ac.uk/publications/oscola.php). 




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Ansgar Ohly
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Intellectual Property

Ansgar Ohly joined the Law Faculty as a Visiting Professor in October 2009. He holds law degrees from the Universities of Bonn, Cambridge (LL M) and Munich (Dr jur), and he has a chair in civil law, intellectual property and competition law at the University of Munich. Prior to joining the Munich faculty, he was head of the Commonwealth section of the Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law and professor at the University of Bayreuth.

His fields of research are all areas of intellectual property law, unfair competition law and the law of privacy and publicity, with a special focus on European harmonisation and on the comparison between civil law and common law systems.



photo of Alpa Parmar

Alpa Parmar
Departmental Lecturer in Criminology

Centre for Criminology


Alpa read Social and Political Sciences at Cambridge and then completed her doctorate (University of Cambridge) in which she empirically examined perceptions of Asian criminality in the UK. Following this she held a British Academy Postdoctoral fellowship at King's College London in which she researched police stop and search practices under the Terrorism Act 2000 and the consequences of counter-terrorist polices for minority ethnic groups - particularly British Asian people. Theoretically her research considers the implications of security practices upon notions of belonging and ethnic identity, and multi-cultural citizenry. During her postdoctoral fellowship, she was a visiting scholar at Berkeley, University of California, at which time she conducted a comparative policing study on stop and search and stop and frisk. Her book Crime and the Asian Community is forthcoming (Oxford University Press) and her recent publications include 'Stop and Search in London: Counter-terrorist or counter-productive?' (2011 in Policing and Society 21(4)) and 'Configuring Ethnic Identities: resistance as a response to counter-terrorist policy' (2013 in New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime edited by Coretta Phillips and Colin Webster). In addition to researching ethnicity, gender, racism and criminalization, Alpa's current project explores the intersection of securitization and race and the consequences this has on migrants crossing borders between India, Europe and the USA.



photo of Jennifer Payne

Jennifer Payne
Professor of Corporate Finance Law

Merton College

Teaches: Company Law, Corporate Finance, Trusts, Law and Finance, Corporate Insolvency Law, Principles of Financial Regulation

Research interests: Company Law, Corporate Finance, Corporate Insolvency, Financial Regulation

Jennifer Payne is Professor of Corporate Finance Law and a fellow and tutor at Merton College, Oxford. She joined the faculty in October 1998, as the Travers Smith lecturer in Corporate Finance Law.  She was formerly a student at Jesus College, Cambridge, a solicitor with Herbert Smith, and then a lecturer at Robinson College, Cambridge. She teaches courses on company law, corporate finance law, corporate insolvency law and principles of financial regulation.  She writes widely in the field of corporate law in leading journals and edited collections.  Her recent publications include Corporate Finance Law: Principles and Policy (Hart, 2011, with Louise Gullifer); Intermediated Securities: Legal Problems and Practical Issues (Hart, 2010) (with Louise Gullifer); and Rationality in Company Law: Essays in honour of DD Prentice (Hart, 2009) (with John Armour). She is a contributor to Palmer's Company Law and an editor of the Journal of Corporate Law Studies.



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Edwin Peel
Professor of Law

Keble College

Teaches: Conflict of Laws, Contract, International Trade, Restitution, Tort

Research interests: Contract, Torts, Conflict of Laws

Fellow of Keble College 1994-, Professor of Law 2010-

 



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Justine Pila
University Lecturer in Intellectual Property Law

A University Lecturership is a tenured (or tenure-track) position involving teaching and research duties for the University. A College Tutorial Fellowship is often held jointly with the University Lecturership. University Lecturers have greater University obligations and lighter College obligations than CUF Lecturers.

St Catherine's College & Institute of European and Comparative Law

Teaches: Intellectual Property, European Union Law

 

Fellow, Senior Law Tutor and College Counsel, St Catherine's College

Research Fellow, Institute of European and Comparative Law


BA/LLB Hons (Melbourne), PhD (Melbourne), DipLATHE (Oxford)


 

Justine Pila came to Oxford in 2004 to take up her faculty and college posts. Before then she had been writing her PhD after three years as an intellectual property solicitor at Mallesons Stephen Jaques and two years as Associate to the Chief Justice of the Australian Federal Court. 

Her most recent publications (from 2014 and 2013) are as follows:

  1. J Pila, 'Lord Hoffmann and Purposive Interpretation in Intellectual Property Law' in Lord Hoffmann's Jurisprudence (Hart Publishing, 2015) forthcoming
  2. J Pila, 'An Historical Perspective: The Unitary Patent Package' in Pila & Wadlow (eds), Perspectives on the Unitary (EU) Patent System (Hart Publishing, 2014) forthcoming
  3. J Pila, 'Isolated human genes: the patent equivalent of a non-copyrightable sound recording' (2014) Law Quarterly Review forthcoming
  4. J Pila, 'Patent Eligibility and Scope Revisited in the Light of Schütz v. Werit, European Law and Copyright Jurisprudence' in R.C. Dreyfuss & J.C. Ginsburg (eds), Intellectual Property at the Edge: The Contested Contours of IP (Cambridge University Press 2014)
  5. J Pila, 'Pluralism, Principles and Proportionality in Intellectual Property' (2014) 34 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 181-200
  6. J Pila, 'The European Patent: An Old and Vexing Problem' (2013) 62(4) International & Comparative Law Quarterly 917–940
  7. J Pila, 'A Constitutionalised Doctrine of Precedent and the Marleasing Principle as Bases for a European Legal Methodology' in A Ohly & J Pila (eds), The Europeanisation of Intellectual Property Law: Towards a European Legal Methodology (OUP 2013)
  8. J Pila, 'Intellectual Property Law as a Case Study in European Harmonisation: Methodological Themes and Context' in A Ohly & J Pila (eds), The Europeanisation of Intellectual Property Law: Towards a European Legal Methodology (OUP 2013)
  9. A Ohly & J Pila (eds), The Europeanisation of Intellectual Property Law: Towards a European Legal Methodology (OUP 2013)
  10. J Pila, 'Professional and Academic Employee Inventions: Looking Beyond the UK Paradigm' in M Pittard, A Monitti and J Duns (eds), Business Innovation: A Legal Balancing Act – Perspectives from Intellectual Property, Labour and Employment, Competition and Corporate Laws (Edward Elgar 2013)
  11. J Pila, 'What Patent Law for the European Union? Lessons from the Patent Jurisprudence of the CJEU / Quel Droit Des Brevets Pour L'Union Europeenne? Les Enseignements De La Jurisprudence De La CJUE' in C. Geiger (ed), What Patent Law for the European Union? (Litec 2013)


photo of Fernanda Pirie

Fernanda Pirie
Associate Professor of Socio-Legal Studies

Centre for Socio-Legal Studies & St Cross College

Teaches: Law in Society

Research interests: Anthropology of law, Tibetan law and legal practices, Legalism, The English Bar

Qualifications DPhil in Social Anthropology (Oxford) 2002 MSc in Social Anthropology (UCL) 1998 Called to the Bar 1988 BA in French and Philosophy (Oxford) 1986

Bibliography An anthropologist specialising in Tibetan societies, Fernanda has used her research into legal practices and legal codes to develop the anthropology of law. Presented in The Anthropology of Law (OUP, 2013), her approach builds on themes and debated developed in the Legalism research group, which she convenes with colleagues in anthropology and history. It is the basis for continuing research in to Tibetan legal history, as well as related issues, such as comparison in law and anthropology and the relationship between empirical studies and legal theory.

Core teaching

  • Law in Society (BCL/MJur, MSc/MPhil in anthropology)
  • Anthropological methods in socio-legal studies
  • Anthropology of Tibet


photo of Jeremias Prassl

Jeremias Prassl
Associate Professor of Law

Magdalen College

Teaches: European Union Law, Land Law, Labour/Employment Law, Company Law, Corporate Finance, Comparative and European Corporate Law

Research interests: Employment Law, EU Law, Corporate Law and Finance, Civil Aviation

Dr Jeremias Prassl read law at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and the University of Paris II (MA) as well as Harvard Law School (LL.M.) before returning to complete an AHRC-funded DPhil at Magdalen College, Oxford (2010-12). He regularly lectures in Paris and Beijing, and has held or is holding visiting posts at Columbia Law School, New York, the Max Planck Institute, Hamburg and University College, London. Prior to taking up his Fellowship at St John’s, Jeremias was a Stipendiary Lecturer at Jesus College, Oxford. His principal research interests are in the fields of Employment Law, European Union Law, and Civil Aviation.

In Employment Law, Jeremias is particularly interested in the application of regulatory norms in fragmenting labour markets. Recent work includes an in-depth analysis of the notion of the employer in multilateral organisational settings (from agency employment to Private Equity portfolio companies) and critiques of the newly introduced notion of employee shareholders. Jeremias also serves on the steering committee of INLACRIS, a European Commission-funded network monitoring changes in Social and Labour Law in response to the financial crisis.

In EU Law, he has set up a series of international comparative workshops on the reception and implementation of landmark CJEU judgments in domestic law, beginning in September 2013 with Cases C-438/05, Viking and C-341/05 Laval. Jeremias is also a member of the editorial team for the Ius Commune Casebook on the Horizontal Effects of Primary EU Law.

His work on the EU Passenger Rights Regulation 261/2004 specialises on the purported exclusivity of the Montreal Convention in regulating air carriers’ contractual liability, and has led to consulting and executive education work in the Civil Aviation industry.



photo of Eveline Ramaekers

Eveline Ramaekers
Career Development Fellow at Wadham College

Wadham College

Teaches: European Union Law, Land Law, Trusts

Eveline Ramaekers is a career development fellow at Wadham College. She completed her undergraduate and postgraduate studies (LLB, LLM with distinction) at the European Law School (Maastricht) between 2003-2008. She was awarded a doctorate in European Union property law by Maastricht University in April 2013. Before coming to Oxford she was a visiting lecturer and researcher at the China-EU School of Law (Beijing), the University of Muenster and the South-African Research Chair in Property Law in Stellenbosch. Her research interests include EU property law, comparative property law and private international law.



photo of Denise Réaume

Denise Réaume
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Tort

Denise Réaume was appointed as a Visiting Professor with effect from October 2008. A graduate of the BCL and a full professor at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law since 1996, Professor Réaume has written on constitutional rights, the theory of equality, feminist legal theory, general jurisprudence, and the law of torts. Professor Réaume lectures in Oxford on vicarious liability in the law of torts.



photo of Catherine Redgwell

Catherine Redgwell
Chichele Professor of Public International Law

Oxford Law Faculty & All Souls College

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: Public international law, international environmental law, international energy law

Catherine Redgwell is Chichele Professor of Public International Law and fellow of All Souls College, and Co-Director of the Oxford Geoengineering Programme of the Oxford Martin School.

Her research interests fall broadly within the public international field, including international energy law and international environmental law. She has co-authored two leading texts on international environmental law, Birnie, Boyle and Redgwell, International Law & the Environment (OUP, 3rd edn, 2009) and Bowman, Davies and Redgwell, Lyster’s International Wildlife Law (CUP, 2nd edn, 2010). In the energy field she has published widely including as co-editor and contributing author on international energy law in Energy Law in Europe (OUP, 3rd edn, forthcoming 2015). She is currently co-investigator in a cross-institutional two year (2012-2014) research project on Climate Geoengineering Governance (CGG) funded by the ESRC and AHRC, led from the Oxford Institute for Science, Innovation and Society.

Catherine’s current affiliations include membership of the Academic Advisory Group of the Section on Energy, Environment, Natural Resources and Infrastructure Law of the International Bar Association, the Council of the British Branch of the International Law Association, and of the Public International Law Advisory Board of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. She is joint general editor of the British Yearbook of International Law and joint editor of the Oxford Monographs in International Law series (OUP), having previously served as joint general editor and chair of the editorial board of the International and Comparative Law Quarterly (2006-20012).

In Oxford, her teaching interests focus on public international law. She has taught on the International Law of the Sea and the Comparative and Global Environmental Law courses offered to BCL and MJur students, and has also taught at the undergraduate level. She is currently supervising research students in the broad areas of international dispute settlement, human rights and humanitarian law, and natural resources law.

Before (re)joining the Oxford Faculty, she held the chair in Public International Law at University College London (2004-2013), having previously held the position of Reader in Public International Law and Yamani Fellow at St Peter’s College (1999-2003). She has also previously held positions at the Universities of Nottingham and Manchester. In 1992/93 she spent six months on secondment to the Legal Advisers, UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office.



photo of Wolf-Georg Ringe

Wolf-Georg Ringe
Departmental Lecturer

Oxford Law Faculty & Institute of European and Comparative Law

Teaches: Comparative and European Corporate Law, Corporate Insolvency Law, Principles of Financial Regulation

Research interests: Law and Finance, Corporate Law and Governance, Financial Regulation, Conflict of Laws

Wolf-Georg Ringe is Professor of International Commercial Law at Copenhagen Business School. He taught full-time at Oxford between 2007-12 and retains a Departmental Lecturer position within the Faculty. In Oxford, he is a Research Fellow at the Institute of European and Comparative Law and an associate member of the Oxford-Man Institute of Quantitative Finance. In Spring 2010, he was a visiting professor at Columbia Law School, New York. As part of a European-wide consortium, he regularly advises the European Parliament on issues of European company law. Georg teaches Principles of Financial Regulation, Corporate Insolvency Law, Comparative and European Corporate Law, and European Business Regulation. His current research interests are in the general area of Law and Finance, (Comparative) Corporate Governance, Securities Law and the Conflict of Laws.

E-mail: georg.ringe [at] law.ox.ac.uk

Tel: +44-1865-281792

Fax: +44-1865-281611

SSRN author page: http://ssrn.com/author=836081



photo of Julian Roberts

Julian Roberts
Professor of Criminology

Centre for Criminology & Worcester College

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminology

Research interests: Sentencing policy and practice; public opinion, crime and criminal justice

Julian Roberts is currently a member of the Sentencing Council of England and Wales, and Associate Editor of the European Journal of Criminology and the Canadian Journal of Criminology.



photo of Aidan Robertson

Aidan Robertson
Visiting Lecturer

Oxford Law Faculty & Centre for Competition Law & Policy

Teaches: Competition Law

Aidan Robertson was Fellow and Tutor in Law, Wadham College, Oxford 1990-1999
Visiting Lecturer in Law, Oxford University 2003 - present
Member of the Treasury B Panel (2002-present: member of C Panel 1999-2001)
Called to the Bar: July 1995 Middle Temple
Solicitor of the Supreme Court of England and Wales 1988-1995
Queen's Counsel 2009



photo of Dominic Roser

Dominic Roser
Research Fellow

Oxford Law Faculty & Pembroke College

Research interests: Human Rights, Climate Change, Political Philosophy

Dominic Roser's research focuses on intergenerational justice, global justice, risk, non-ideal theory as well as the relation between economics and ethics. This combination of topics has arisen out of his interest in climate change. Currently, he works on a rights-based theory of decisions under risk and uncertainty and how such a theory must both deviate from and learn from decision-theoretic accounts. He is particularly concerned with applying this theory to risks to human rights of future generations and to the debate about precautionary principles.

Dominic Roser is a Research Fellow at the Oxford Martin Programme on Human Rights for Future Generations and at the Law Faculty. He has a background in philosophy and economics and has previously worked at the Universities of Bern, Zurich, and Graz.




photo of Jacob Rowbottom

Jacob Rowbottom
Associate Professor of Law

University College

Research interests: Media law, freedom of expression, and the legal regulation of the democratic process.

Jacob Rowbottom is a Fellow of University College, Oxford, and an Associate Professor of Law in the Faculty of Law, University of Oxford.  He holds a BA in Jurisprudence from Oxford and an LLM from New York University School of Law.  He was previously a University Lecturer in Law and Fellow of King's College at the University of Cambridge. He is a qualified barrister and previously worked on the staff of an election campaign for the US Senate. His research interests include media law, freedom of expression and the legal regulation of the democratic process. He is the author of Democracy Distorted (2010) and writes on a range of topics including the funding of political parties, media regulation, speech on the internet, election campaigns and obscenity laws.  



photo of Richard Salter

Richard Salter
Visiting Fellow

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Corporate Finance

Richard Salter QC is a practising barrister, whose chambers are at 3 Verulam Buildings in Gray’s Inn.   Richard was called to the Bar in 1975, and was elected as a Bencher of the Inner Temple in 1991.    He took silk in 1995, was appointed a Recorder of the Crown Court in 2000, and was authorised to sit as a Deputy High Court Judge in the Queen’s Bench division in 2010.   He was Chairman of the Inner Temple’s Scholarship Committee from 2002 to 2009, Chairman of the London Common Law & Commercial Bar Association from 2004-5, a member of the Bar Council from 2004 to 2013, and Chairman of the Bar Council Legal Services Committee from 2010 to 2013.

Richard is a commercial lawyer, specialising in banking and financial law.  He has appeared in many of the leading English cases in this area, including the Bank Charges litigation (which ended in the House of Lords) and Belmont v BNY Corporate Trustee Services (which ended in the Supreme Court).  He has also appeared before courts and arbitral tribunals in many other common-law jurisdictions.  He was Chambers & Partners Banking and Finance Silk of the Year in 2012.

Publications: 20 Halsbury’s Laws (4th ed 1993 re-issue), Guarantee and Indemnity; consulting editor, All England Commercial Cases; editor, Legal Decisions Affecting Bankers, Vols 12-14; Banks, Liability & Risk (1991, 3rd ed 2001) (contrib); Banks and Remedies (1992, 2nd ed 1999) (contrib).    Together with a team from his chambers, he is preparing a book on the Modern Law of Guarantees for publication in 2014/5.



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Carol Sanger
Visiting Professor: Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia Law School

Oxford Law Faculty


Carol Sanger is currently Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, having held that position since 1995. Professor Sanger will teach at Oxford in the area of medical law and ethics, and family law.



photo of Dan Sarooshi

Dan Sarooshi
Professor of Public International Law

The Queen's College

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: International Law

Dan Sarooshi is also a Senior Research Fellow of the Queen's College, Oxford; an FRSA; and co-General Editor of the Oxford Monographs in International Law Series. He was elected in 2008 to membership of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law.

His books include International Organizations and Their Exercise of Sovereign Powers  (OUP, 2005), The UN and the Development of Collective Security (OUP, 1999), the edited Responsibility and Remedies for the Actions of International Organizations (Martinus Nijhoff, Hague Academy of International Law Imprint) (forthcoming: 2014), and the co-edited State Responsibility Before International Judicial Institutions  (Hart, 2004). The first two of these books have been awarded the 2000 (biennial) Guggenheim Prize by the Guggenheim Foundation in Switzerland; the 2001 American Society of International Law Book Prize; the 2006 Myres S. McDougal Prize awarded by the American Society for the Policy Sciences; and the 2006 American Society of International Law Book Prize.

Professor Sarooshi has co-authored with Judge Dame Rosalyn Higgins FBA, QC, former President of the International Court of Justice, the long chapter entitled Institutional Modes of Conflict Management in National Security Law  (2005) (108 pp.).

He was appointed by the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2006 to the WTO Dispute Settlement List of Panellists after joint nomination by the United Kingdom Government and the European Communities.

Link to Public International Law @ Oxford




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Tom Scott
Visiting Lecturer

Oxford Law Faculty


Tom Scott is a Visiting Lecturer in Law at the Law faculty. He is qualified as a Solicitor in England and Wales and was formerly a Visiting Lecturer in Law at Lincoln College. He was a tax partner at the international law firm Linklaters, where he worked for 23 years, and subsequently at KPMG LLP. He is currently Chairman of the UK branch of the International Fiscal Association and a member of the Tax Advisory Board at PLC magazine. He has written articles on tax for the Times, international tax Review, PLC magazine and Accountancy, and contributed to books such as Tolley's Tax Planning and Tolley's Company Acquisitions Handbook.



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Sir Stephen Sedley
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty


Called to the Bar, Inner Temple, 1964

Queen's Counsel, 1983

Bencher of the Inner Temple, 1989

Judge of the High Court, Queen's Bench Division, 1992-9

Lord Justice of Appeal, 1999-2011

Judge ad hoc of the European Court of Human Rights

Member ad hoc of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council

                                     

                                                               ***

Member, International Commission on Mercenaries, 1976

Visiting professorial Fellow, Warwick University, 1981

President, National Reference Tribunals for the Coalmining Industry, 1983-8

A director, Public Law Project, 1989-93

Distinguished Visitor, Hong Kong University, 1992

Chair, Bar Council sex discrimination committee, 1992-5

Vice-President, Administrative Law bar Association, 1992-

Hon. Fellow, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 1997-

Laskin Visiting Professor, Osgoode Hall law school, Canada, 1997

Visiting fellow, Victoria University, NZ, 1998.

President, British Institute of Human Rights, 2000-

Chair, British Council Committee on Governance, 2002-5

President, Constitutional Law Group,  2006-

 

Honours                        

Knight Bachelor 1992

Privy Counsellor 1999

Honorary doctorates: North London, Nottingham Trent, Bristol, Warwick, Durham, Hull, Southampton, Exeter, Essex.

Honorary Professor, Cardiff University (1993-), Warwick University (1994- )

Distinguished judicial visitor, UCL (1999-)

 

Publications:                 

Articles in journals including LQR, Public Law, MLR, ILJ, JLS and the London Review of Books.

Chapters in collections and festschrifts.

Books:-

From Burgos Gaol (poems by Marcos Ana and Vidal de Nicolas, translated) 1964

The Seeds of Love (anthology) 1967

A Spark in the Ashes (ed with Lawrence Kaplan) (the writings of John Warr), 1992

The Making and Remaking of the British Consitution (with Lord Nolan; the 1996 Radcliffe Lectures) 1997

Freedom, Law and Justice (the Hamlyn Lectures) 1998

Ashes and Sparks (collected essays and lectures) 2011



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Andrew Shacknove
University Lecturer in Law (Department of Continuing Education)

A University Lecturership is a tenured (or tenure-track) position involving teaching and research duties for the University. A College Tutorial Fellowship is often held jointly with the University Lecturership. University Lecturers have greater University obligations and lighter College obligations than CUF Lecturers.

Department for Continuing Education & Kellogg College

Teaches: Human Rights Law, Public International Law

Research interests: Public International Law, Human Rights and Forced Migration

Andrew Shacknove (AB Bowdoin; PhD Yale; JD Harvard; MA, Oxon). University Lecturer in Law and Director of Legal Studies, University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education and Fellow of Kellogg College, Oxford.

Formerly a lawyer with UNHCR in Malaysia, Dr Shacknove was for many years a consultant with the United Kingdom Home Office Asylum Division. Between 1990 and 1993 he was Joyce Pearce Research Fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford.

He is Co-Director of the Oxford/George Washington University Summer Programme in International Human Rights Law and Academic Adviser to the Adilisha Project of human rights training in southern Africa.

Special Interests: Public International Law, Human Rights and Forced Migration.

Link to Public International Law @ Oxford



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Robert Sharpe
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Civil Procedure

Robert Sharpe is a judge at the Court of Appeal for Ontario in Toronto. He will be teaching Civil Procedure on the BCL.



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Andrew Simester
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty


Andrew Simester holds a Provost’s Chair at the National University of Singapore and an Honorary Professorship at the University of Uppsala. He is also a Director of the Centre for Penal Theory and Penal Ethics at the University of Cambridge. His primary interests lie in criminal law and theory, and his writings in these areas have been cited by senior appellate courts throughout the world. Andrew's books include two leading treatises on criminal law, in England and New Zealand, and a recent monograph on criminalisation theory (Crimes, Harm, and Wrongs, with Professor Andreas von Hirsch).



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Natasha Simonsen
Lecturer in Law, New College

St Peter's College & New College & Centre for Criminology

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminal Law, Human Rights Law, Public International Law, Tort

Research interests: Natasha's doctoral research on torture and inhuman or degrading treatment considers the intersection between human rights, criminal justice and national security.

Natasha teaches Tort Law, Constitutional Law and European Human Rights Law at undergraduate level, and Criminal Justice, Security and Human Rights at graduate level. Her doctoral research concerns the distinction between torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Natasha is admitted to practice as a lawyer in NSW, Australia and previously worked for the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions in Sydney. She has worked as a consultant on human rights and criminal justice for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCR), the Government of Pakistan, and for NGOs in Pakistan and Iraq.



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Edwin Simpson
Associate Professor of Law

Christ Church

Teaches: Philosophy of Law, Taxation, Trusts

Research interests: Jurisprudence, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Trusts, Taxation

Edwin Simpson (BCL 1989, MA 1990) is an Official Student (or Tutor) in Law at Christ Church, and the Barclays Bank Lecturer in Taxation in the University. He is a qualified barrister and member of Lincoln's Inn.

His interests focus around theories of the public sphere and of property, and naturally meet in topics such as trusts law, highway law, and the law of taxation.

He gives tutorials in Trusts Law, Administrative Law and Jurisprudence; and teaches on both of the BCL/MJur tax courses, the Law of Personal Taxation, and Corporate and Business Taxation.



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Roger Smith
Associate Professor of Law

Magdalen College

Teaches: Company Law, Land Law, Personal Property, Roman Law, Taxation, Tort, Trusts

Research interests: Real Property (especially land registration)

MA 1974, Cantab; Fellow, Magdalen College, 1974- ; CUF Lect, 1974- .

Formerly Lecturer, Birmingham, 1970-71; Fellow, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, 1971-74



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Benjamin Spagnolo
Penningtons Student in Law

Christ Church

Teaches: Roman Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law

Research interests: Public law, Roman law and jurisprudence

Ben Spagnolo is a graduate of the Universities of Western Australia and Oxford, a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of Western Australia and a former Associate to the Chief Justice of Australia. He was elected to the Penningtons Studentship in Law at Christ Church in 2012, having previously taught at the University of Western Australia and at a dozen colleges in Oxford, including as a lecturer at Magdalen and University Colleges and as a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Faculty of Law. Ben is a former Sir Robert Menzies Scholar in Law, a former Clarendon Scholar and a recipient of a University of Oxford Teaching Award. He served as Mooting Coordinator for the Faculty from 2008 to 2010 and as Sub-Dean at Magdalen College in 2011-2012.



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Jane Stapleton
Visiting Professor

Oxford Law Faculty


Jane Stapleton is one of the world's leading scholars on the law of Torts. She is Research Professor at the Australian National University, College of Law, Canberra, Australia, and Ernest E. Smith Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, USA.



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Nicos Stavropoulos
Associate Professor of Legal Theory

Oxford Law Faculty

Teaches: Philosophy of Law

Research interests: Jurisprudence, Legal Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Mind, Political Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy

B. Jur. (Athens), LL.M. (Lond), D.Phil. (Oxon).

 

Nicos Stavropoulos is the Associate Professor of Legal Theory.  He joined the Faculty when he was appointed to the University Lectureship in Legal Theory, a permanent post in legal philosophy then newly established by the University. His research interests are in jurisprudence. He is particularly interested in the philosophy of language and mind, moral philosophy, and political philosophy, and their bearing on legal theory.  His book Objectivity in Law  was published by Clarendon Press (1996).  He teaches and supervises research in jurisprudence.

Stavropoulos completed the DPhil at Brasenose.  Prior to joining the Faculty he practiced for several years, and served as Special Adviser in policy units under the Minister of Energy and Industry of Greece and at the Secretariat of the Cabinet under the Prime Minister of Greece.

In 2001-2, Stavropoulos was a Fellow at the Program in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University. In 2006 he established the Oxford-UCL Colloquium in Legal and Political Philosophy, meeting alternately in Oxford and in London. He serves on the board of Legal Theory and Law and Philosophy.



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Sandy Steel
Associate Professor of Law

Wadham College

Teaches: Contract, Philosophy of Law, Roman Law, Tort

Research interests: Tort, Contract, Private Law Theory, Comparative Law.

 

Sandy Steel has a BA and PhD in law from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. From 2010-2014 he was a Lecturer in Law at King’s College London.

Some of his research is concerned with looking at aspects of the law of obligations, particularly tort law, through the lens of moral and political philosophy. Other research is concerned with comparative tort law, particularly French and German tort law.



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Jonny Steinberg
Associate Professor of African Criminology

Centre for Criminology & African Studies Centre


Jonny Steinberg is the author of several books about crime, policing and punishment in the wake of South Africa's transition to democracy. Two of them, Midlands (2002), about the murder of a white South African farmer, and The Number (2004), a biography of a prison gangster, won South Africa's premier nonfiction award, the Sunday Times Alan Paton Prize. His books also include Thin Blue (2008), an exploration of the unwritten rules of engagement between South African civilians and police. Jonny has also written several monographs on criminal justice policy for South African think tanks and has published widely in journals such as the British Journal of Criminology, Theoretical Criminology and Policing & Society. He is an Associate Professor of African Studies at Oxford University and is a research associate at the Institute for Humanities in Africa (Huma) at the University of Cape Town.



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Robert Stevens
Herbert Smith Freehills Professor of English Private Law

Lady Margaret Hall

Teaches: Restitution

Professor Robert Stevens joins the faculty as the Herbert Smith Freehills Professor of English Private Law. Previously he was a Professor in commercial law at UCL , a lecturer in law at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor in Law at Lady Margaret Hall where he taught from 1994 to 2007.

He read law as an undergraduate at the University of Oxford, where he also studied for the Bachelor of Civil Law. He was called to the Bar in 1992. He has taught and lectured widely both within the Commonwealth (Australia and Canada) and Continental Europe (Germany, the Netherlands, Spain).



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William Swadling
Reader in Property Law

Brasenose College

Teaches: Land Law, Personal Property, Restitution, Trusts

Research interests: Property (real and personal); Restitution; Trusts

William Swadling, MA (Oxon), LLM (Lond) is the faculty's Director of Graduate Studies (Taught Courses), a Reader in the Law of Property, and the Senior Law Fellow at Brasenose College. He chairs the faculty's teaching groups in Restitution and Personal Property. Before coming to Oxford, he held posts at a number of other universities, including University College London and Trinity College, Cambridge. He is the editor of a number of books, including The Quistclose Trust: Critical Essays. He is particularly interested in the intersection between trusts/property and restitution, and a number of his articles on this topic have been cited in the English courts, most notably in Westdeutsche Landesbank Girozentrale v Islington LBC [1996] AC 669. He is a contributor to Halsbury's Laws of England (4th ed, reissue), and wrote the section entitled 'Property' in Burrows (ed), English Private Law (2nd ed, 2007). He is a founding editor of the Restitution Law Review and has held visiting professorships at the University of Hamburg, Seoul National University, the National University of Singapore, University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas), and the University of Leuven. He is an academic associate at One Essex Court (chambers of Lord Grabiner QC), a Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne, an elected member of the American Law Institute, and an academic member of the Chancery Bar Association.




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Antonios Tzanakopoulos
Associate Professor of Public International Law

St Anne's College

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests:

Public International Law; International Responsibility; Treaty Law; International Human Rights Law; Law of International Organisations; Law of the Sea; International Dispute Settlement

DPhil (Oxf), LLM (NYU) LLM LLB (Athens)

 

Antonios is Associate Professor of Public International Law at the Faculty of Law and Fellow in Law at St Anne's College. He has been visiting lecturer at the Universities of Paris (Paris X – Nanterre) and London (King's College). He was previously lecturer in international law at University College London and at the University of Glasgow. 

Antonios studied law in Athens, New York, and Oxford, during which time he also worked as a Researcher for the Hellenic Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Athens and New York, and for the UN Office in Geneva. 

Antonios is a general international lawyer and has published in a number of areas reflecting his varied research interests. His books include Disobeying the Security Council (OUP 2011, re-issued in paperback with a new introduction 2013); The Settlement of International Disputes (Hart 2012, co-edited with CJ Tams); The UN Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of States and their Property (OUP 2013, edited by R O'Keefe and CJ Tams, ass't ed) and the Research Handbook on the Law of Treaties (Elgar 2014, co-edited with CJ Tams and A Zimmermann). He has also published in the fields of the law of the sea, international investment law, and others. 

Antonios has advised states, international organizations, and private entities on matters of public international law. He has advised and assisted counsel and members of tribunals or provided expert opinions in a number of cases before international and domestic courts and tribunals, including the International Court of Justice, EU courts, the European Court of Human Rights, ad hoc and ICSID arbitral tribunals, and the High Court of England and Wales. He has also provided training on international law to domestic judges, as well as diplomats, military officers, and other government officials.

Antonios is a permanent contributor to EJIL: Talk! (the blog of the European Journal of International Law); a member of the editorial board of Oxford Reports on International Law in Domestic Courts; the Secretary-General of the International Law Association and the Joint Secretary of its British Branch; and the Co-Rapporteur of the ILA Study Group on Principles of Engagement of Domestic Courts with International Law



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Niranjan V
Stipendiary Lecturer in Law

Lady Margaret Hall & St John's College

Research interests: Contract, Tort, Remedies, Unjust Enrichment

Niranjan is a Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Lady Margaret Hall. He read for the BCL on a Rhodes scholarship at Magdalen (Vinerian Scholarship 2011), and obtained his undergraduate degree from the National Law School of India University, Bangalore. His research interests lie in the law of obligations.



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Philippe van Parijs
Visiting Professor

Nuffield College

Teaches: European Union Law

Professor Philippe van Parijs joined the Faculty in April this year as a Visiting Professor and Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College.

Philippe Van Parijs studied philosophy, law, political economy, sociology and linguistics at the Facultés universitaires Saint Louis (Brussels) and the Universities of Louvain, Oxford, Bielefeld and California (Berkeley). He holds doctorates in the social sciences (Louvain, 1977) and in philosophy (Oxford, 1980).

He is Professor at the Faculty of economic, social and political sciences of the University of Louvain (UCL), where he has directed the Hoover Chair of economic and social ethics since its creation in 1991. He has also been a special guest professor at the KuLeuven's Higher Institute for Philosophy since 2006. From 2004 onwards he was for several years a Regular Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Harvard University.



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Kristin van Zwieten
Clifford Chance Associate Professor of Law and Finance

Harris-Manchester College

Teaches: Corporate Insolvency Law

Research interests: Corporate Insolvency Law; Law and Finance

Kristin was appointed to the position of Clifford Chance University Lecturer in Law and Finance and Fellow of Harris Manchester College in September 2013.  Kristin holds law degrees from the University of NSW and Oxford (BCL, M Phil in Law, D Phil in Law).  

Prior to taking up her position at Oxford, Kristin was a Fellow in Law at Trinity Hall, Cambridge.  She has also been a visitor to Columbia Law School and the University of Melbourne, and an occasional lecturer at the University of Hamburg.

Kristin previously qualified as a solicitor in an Australian corporate law firm.  She is a member of the technical committee of the Insolvency Lawyers' Association in the UK. 

Kristin's research interests include corporate insolvency law, and law and financial development in emerging markets.  She has been involved in insolvency law reform projects at the World Bank.  She also currently acts as a consultant to the Vidhi Centre for Legal Policy (New Delhi) in its ongoing work for the Indian government in debt enforcement and insolvency law reform.

Current research projects include: Co-investigator, 'Law, Development and Finance in Rising Powers', ESRC Rising Powers and Interdependent Futures grant, 2013-2015; Reporter, 'Rescue of Business in Insolvency Law' European Law Institute, 2013-2016.



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Federico Varese
Professor of Criminology

Centre for Criminology & Department of Sociology

Research interests: Criminology, Organised crime, corruption, Soviet criminal history, and the dynamics of altruistic behaviour. He is currently working on the application of network analysis to criminal behaviour and a comparative study of Mafia groups.

Federico Varese is Professor of Criminology in the Department of Sociology at the University of Oxford. He maintains active research links with the Centre in his capacity as Research Associate.



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John Vella
Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation

Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation

Teaches: Law and Finance, Taxation, Company Law

Research interests: Taxation, Corporate Tax Law, Company Law, Corporate Finance Law, Financial Regulation

John Vella is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation and a member of the Faculty of Law at Oxford. John studied law at the University of Malta (BA and LLD) and the University of Cambridge (LLM and PhD). Following the completion of his PhD he joined the Faculty of Law at Oxford as Norton Rose Career Development Fellow in Company Law where he taught Company Law, Corporate Finance Law, EC Law and Roman Law, before moving to his current post.

John has been a Program Affiliate Scholar at New York University and has acted as a co-arbitrator in a tax dispute before the ICC International Court of Arbitration. He gave evidence: before the House of Lords EU Sub- Commmittee A on Financial Transaction Taxes in November 2011; before the Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards  on the role of tax in relation to banking standards and culture in January 2013; and before the House of Lords EU Sub- Commmittee A again on Financial Transaction Taxes  in March 2013. 

His recent research has focused on tax avoidance, revenue authorities' discretionary powers and the taxation and regulation of the financial sector in the aftermath of the financial crisis.



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Jure Vidmar
Leverhulme Early Career Fellow

St John's College

Teaches: Public International Law

Research interests: Public international law, human rights, European law, political theory

Dr Jure Vidmar is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in the Faculty of Law and Research Fellow of St John's College, Oxford. He is also an Extraordinary Lecturer at the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria, and a Visiting Fellow at Harvard Law School. Previously, he was an Anglo-German Fellow at the Institute of European and Comparative Law, University of Oxford, and prior to that a post-doctoral researcher at the Amsterdam Center for International Law, University of Amsterdam.

Jure's main research and teaching interests lie within international law, human rights, European law, and legal and political theory. Jure is the author of a monograph entitled 'Democratic Statehood in International Law: The Emergence of New States in Post-Cold War Practice' (Oxford, Hart, 2013, Joint Runner Up for the Society of Legal Scholars Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship 2014) and co-editor (with Erika de Wet) of 'Hierarchy in International Law: The Place of Human Rights' (Oxford, OUP, 2012). He is also an editor of the Hague Yearbook of International Law. Some of his publications are available on SSRN.



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Julia Viebach
Career Development Lecturer

Centre for Criminology

Research interests: Transitional Justice; Memorialisation; Critical Theory; Criminal Archives; Rwanda

Julia currently holds a position as Career Development Lecturer. Previously, she worked as postdoctoral fellow in the ESRC Knowledge Exchange Project "Ways of Knowing After Atrocity" that was run by Oxford Transitional Justice Research and the Centre for Criminology. Before she came to Oxford, Julia was a research fellow at the Center for Conflict Studies of University of Marburg.

Julia obtained her doctorate from the University of Marburg. Her doctoral research explored how societies remember their past after massive violence and how they transform a traumatic rupture evoked by violence. Focused on the case of Rwanda her thesis is both a empirical enquiry into memorialisation and transitional justice in Rwanda as well as the development of a broader theoretical concept of how societies deal with a traumatic past.

Currently Julia works on issues pertaining to archival narratives that emerge from the Rwandan Gacaca archival documents. Her research is concerned with the ways narratives of the harm committed emerge and how the underlying assumptions of the Gacaca courts are addressed in the archival texts.

 



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Stefan Vogenauer
Linklaters Professor of Comparative Law

Brasenose College & Institute of European and Comparative Law

Teaches: Comparative Private Law

Research interests: Comparative Law, European Legal History, Private Law, International Uniform Law, Legal Method

Stefan Vogenauer took up the post of Professor of Comparative Law at the University of Oxford and Fellow of Brasenose College in 2003. He has been Director of the Oxford Institute of European and Comparative Law since October 2004.

Before coming to Oxford, Professor Vogenauer was based in Hamburg where he was a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law and a part-time lecturer at the Bucerius Law School. Previously he had been a Research Assistant at the Regensburg Law Faculty, having received his legal education in Kiel, Paris, Oxford (Trinity College, MJur 1995, Clifford Chance and Herbert Hart Prizes) and Regensburg where he qualified as a German barrister ('Rechtsanwalt').

Professor Vogenauer convenes the BCL/MJur course in 'European Private law: Contract'. Further courses and classes taught while in Oxford include 'International Commercial Arbitration', 'Transnational Commercial Law', 'Problems in Contract and Tort (German and English Law Compared)', 'Introduction to Comparative Law', 'The Common Law for Civil Lawyers' and 'Roman Law of Contract'. Apart from comparative law his research interests lie mainly in the areas of European legal history, private law, international uniform law, and legal method.

In 2012 a Humboldt Award was conferred upon Professor Vogenauer 'in recognition of his lifetime achievements in research'. For his comparative and historical analysis of the interpretation of statutes in English, French, German and EU law, 'Die Auslegung von Gesetzen in England und auf dem Kontinent' (Verlag Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen 2001, 2 vols), he was awarded the Max Weber Prize of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the Otto Hahn Medal of the Max Planck Society in 2002, as well as the 2008 Prize of the German Legal History Conference.



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Andreas von Goldbeck
DAAD Lecturer in German and European Union Law

Christ Church & Institute of European and Comparative Law

Teaches: Comparative Private Law, European Union Law

Dr Andreas von Goldbeck is the DAAD Lecturer in German and European Union Law, and Fellow at Christ Church. Andreas studied law at the Humboldt-Universität Berlin before going on to read for the MJur at St John's College, Oxford. Following his studies at Oxford he obtained his PhD at Trinity College, Cambridge under the supervision of Tony Weir. Subsequently, Andreas qualified as a Solicitor of England and Wales. His main teaching and research interests are in the areas of international arbitration, European private law, European Union Law, comparative law and private international law.



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Konstanze Von Papp
Erich Brost Career Development Fellow in German and European Union Law

Institute of European and Comparative Law & St Hilda's College

Teaches: European Union Law, Public International Law

Research interests: Her current research focus is on the relationship between European Union law and international investment treaty law and arbitration.

Dr Konstanze von Papp holds degrees from the Universities of Tübingen (first and second state examination), Aix-Marseille III (maîtrise en droit international), Columbia Law School (LLM), and Heidelberg University (Dr iur).

Before returning to academia, Konstanze was a Senior Associate with Allen and Overy LLP, London. She is dual qualified as German Rechtsanwältin and Solicitor of England and Wales, including Higher Rights of Audience.

Most recently, Konstanze was a Visiting Researcher at Boston University. Her academic interests (both teaching and research) lie mainly in European Union law, comparative law, and arbitration. Konstanze has published in German legal journals and the Common Market Law Review.



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Jeremy Waldron
Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory

Department of Politics and International Relations




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Stephen Weatherill
Jacques Delors Professor of European Law

Somerville College & Centre for Competition Law & Policy

Teaches: European Business Regulation, European Union Law, Environmental Law

Research interests: European Law, Consumer Law, Competition Law

Stephen Weatherill is the Jacques Delors Professor of European Law. He also serves as Deputy Director for European Law in the Institute of European and Comparative Law, and is a Fellow of Somerville College.

His research interests embrace the field of European Law in its widest sense, although his published work is predominantly concerned with European Union trade law. He is co-author of WEATHERILL AND BEAUMONT's EU LAW Penguin Books, 3rd edition,1999, with Paul Beaumont). He is the author of LAW AND INTEGRATION IN THE EUROPEAN UNION (Oxford University Press, 1995), EU CONSUMER LAW AND POLICY (Edward Elgar, 2nd edition, 2005), CASES AND MATERIALS ON EU LAW (Oxford University Press, 9th edition, 2010) and co-author of CONSUMER PROTECTION LAW (Ashgate Publishing, 2nd edition, 2005, with Geraint Howells and EUROPEAN ECONOMIC LAW (Dartmouth Publishing, 1997, with Hans Micklitz). The areas in which he has published papers in journals and edited collections in recent years include; the impact of subsidiarity in EU law; the involvement of the EU in private law; aspects of "flexible" integration in Europe; the elaboration of strategies for the management of the internal market; sport and the law including the ruling in BOSMAN; and the law and practice of product safety.

In Oxford, his teaching interests focus on EU law. He has taught on the European Business Regulation course, Land and Competition Law, offered to BCL and Mjur students and has also taught at undergraduate level.

Before joining the Oxford Faculty, he held the Jean Monnet Chair of European Law at the University of Nottingham, and he has also previously held positions at the Universities of Manchester and Reading since beginning his academic career as a research assistant at Brunel University.



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Se-shauna Wheatle

Balliol College & Exeter College

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law

Research interests: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Human Rights Law, Comparative Constitutional Law

Se-shauna Wheatle LL.B (Hons) (University of the West Indies) BCL (Dist), MPhil (Oxon) was Stipendiary Lecturer in Law at Exeter College and is now a researcher at Durham Law School. She came to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar and has since pursued research in the fields of comparative human rights law and comparative constitutional law. She has now completed her DPhil in Law at Balliol College, Oxford.



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Christopher Whelan
Associate Director, International Law Programmes, Department for Continuing Education

Department for Continuing Education


Christopher Whelan is Associate Director of International Law Programmes at the University's Department for Continuing Education. Before that he was Senior Lecturer in law at the University of Warwick and Research Associate at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies. He is also a practising barrister (specialising in employment law) at 3 Paper Buildings, Temple.



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Simon Whittaker
Professor of European Comparative Law

St John's College

Teaches: Comparative Private Law, Comparative Public Law, Contract, Restitution, Roman Law, Tort

Research interests: Comparative Law, Contract and Tort, European Union Law.

Simon Whittaker has been a fellow and tutor in law at St. John's College since 1987, previously being a lecturer in laws at King's College's London. He took his degrees at Oxford (BA,1979; BCL, 1980; MA, 1982; D.Phil., 1987; DCL, 2008) and was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1987. He has been a visiting lecturer at the University of Regensburg and a visiting professor at the University of Paris I and University of Paris II. He is a member of the American Law Institute.



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Rebecca Williams
Associate Professor of Law

Pembroke College

Teaches: Criminal Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, Philosophy of Law

Research interests:
- Criminal Law (including EU criminal law)
- Public Law (including EU public law and comparative approaches)
- The interrelationship between public law and unjust enrichment

Rebecca Williams holds an Associate Professorship in Law, in association with Pembroke College. Rebecca was previously a fellow of Robinson College, Cambridge, having done her PhD at Birmingham. Before that she was both an undergraduate and a BCL student at Worcester College, Oxford. Rebecca's principal teaching interests are criminal law and public law, and her research interests include:

- Criminal Law (including EU criminal law)

- Public Law (including EU public law and comparative approaches)

- The interrelationship between public law and unjust enrichment

Her work has been cited in the European Court of Justice, the Supreme Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales, and the High Court of Australia.



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Derrick Wyatt
Emeritus Professor of Law

St Edmund Hall

Research interests:

European Union Law

Derrick Wyatt has been a Fellow of St. Edmund Hall since 1978, received the title of Professor in 1996, and retired in 2009. His teaching included EU law, constitutional law, and public International law. He was Visiting Professor of Law at Oxford 2009 - 2014, teaching the law of the EU’s internal market. He has practised as a barrister (Queen's Counsel 1993) from Brick Court Chambers, specialising in litigation before the European Court of Justice and the EU General Court in Luxembourg, and in giving legal advice to businesses and governments. This has involved numerous aspects of EU law, and issues of public international law and constitutional law in the UK and Cyprus. He has appeared in approximately 100 cases before the European Courts in Luxembourg and has represented and/or advised businesses in the UK, Ireland, USA, Germany, and Iran, and the Governments of the UK, Northern Ireland, and Cyprus. He has published numerous articles and contributions to books, served on editorial committees and boards (he is currently a member of the Editorial Board of the Croatian Yearbook of European Law and Policy), and co-authored Wyatt and Dashwood's European Union Law, in its various editions, the latest being its 6th edition (Hart Publishing 2011). He gave evidence to the House of Lords EU Committee in 2004 on the proposed monitoring of subsidiarity by national parliaments under the Treaty Establishing a Constitution for Europe, and to the Foreign Office, on Subsidiarity and Proportionality, and Enlargement of the EU, in 2014, as part of the UK Government’s Balance of Competences Review.



photo of Anzhela Yevgenyeva

Anzhela Yevgenyeva
Research Fellow

Said Business School

Teaches: Taxation, European Union Law

Research interests: EU Law, Taxation

Dr Anzhela Yevgenyeva is a Research Fellow at the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation. She conducts research on various aspects of taxation and EU law with a particular interest in the intersection of these two fields. Anzhela lectures on tax law issues for postgraduate students at the University of Oxford and the Queen Mary University of London, and she teaches EU Law for undergraduate students at Oxford colleges. She is the Managing Editor of the looseleaf encyclopedia D. Vaughan and A. Robertson (eds.), The Law of the EU (Oxford University Press), and one of the convenors of the Oxford EU Law Discussion Group and CBT Tax Research Seminars. 

Anzhela was awarded a doctoral degree in law by the University of Oxford, where she had previously completed her master’s in law (distinction). She also holds a BA and MA in law (honours) from the Law School of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Ukraine. Anzhela has won a number of prestigious scholarships and prizes, which include those awarded by the UK Government, the University of Oxford and the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple. Her doctoral thesis on direct taxation and the Internal Market won the 2014 ELFA First Award for the best thesis on European Law from the European Law Faculties Association, and it was also granted an Honourable Mention in the competition for the 2013 Mitchell B. Carroll Prize by the International Fiscal Association. 

Her professional experience has been gained in common law and civil law jurisdictions. It includes advisory work for state authorities and international organisations, oriented towards the improvement of legal regulation. Her expert opinion was recently cited by HM Treasury in a report that considers what EU membership means for the UK and taxation, which was published as a part of the UK Government’s Balance of Competences Review.



photo of Alison Young

Alison Young
Associate Professor of Law

Hertford College & Centre for Competition Law & Policy

Teaches: Constitutional and Administrative Law, European Union Law, Human Rights Law, Philosophy of Law, Comparative Public Law

Research interests: Constitutional Theory, Human Rights, Public law and European Union law.

Alison L Young is Senior Law Tutor at Hertford College and teaches Constitutional law, Administrative law, European Union law and Comparative Public law, as well as providing occasional seminars in Constitutional Theory and Constitutional Principles of the European Union. She is also the Teaching and Learning Officer for the Faculty, having completed the Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education at the University of Oxford.

She studied Law and French at the University of Birmingham, before coming to Hertford College, obtaining BCL and DPhil. She was a tutor in law and a Fellow of Balliol College from 1997 to 2000, before returning to Hertford as a Fellow and Tutor in law in October 2000.

Her DPhil examined defamation law and freedom of expression and she currently researches in applied constitutional theory, public law and human rights, particularly freedom of expression. She is the author of Parliamentary Sovereignty and the Human Rights Act (Hart, 2009).



photo of Paul Yowell

Paul Yowell
Associate Professor of Law

Oriel College

Teaches: Philosophy of Law

Research interests: He researches broadly in public law and legal theory, with particular interests in the separation of powers, constitutional theory, comparative constitutional law, and human rights.

Paul Yowell has been Fellow and Tutor in Law at Oriel College since October 2012. Prior to that he was Lecturer in Law at New College, and a postdoctoral fellow with the Oxford Law Faculty for the AHRC project Parliaments and Human Rights.

He completed the BCL in European and Comparative Law and MPhil in Law at Balliol College, and the DPhil in Law at University College. His areas of teaching are Constitutional Law, EU Law, Jurisprudence and Human Rights.



photo of Lucia Zedner

Lucia Zedner
Professor of Criminal Justice

Centre for Criminology & Corpus Christi College

Teaches: Criminology and Criminal Justice, Criminal Law, Philosophy of Law, Criminology

Research interests: Security; criminal law; criminal justice; counter-terrorism; penal theory and philosophy of criminal law

Lucia Zedner is Professor of Criminal Justice, Law Fellow at Corpus Christi College, Oxford and a Member of the Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford.

She was formerly a student and then Prize Research Fellow at Nuffield College Oxford (1984-89) and a lecturer at the London School of Economics (1989-94). She returned to Oxford in 1994, becoming a Reader in 1999 and Professor in 2005. She has served on the Research College of the Economic and Social Science Research Council (ESRC - 2005-08); on the Advisory Panel of The Leverhulme Trust (2013- present) and the Projects Committee of The British Academy (2013- present). She was elected a Fellow of The British Academy in 2012.

She has held visiting fellowships at universities in Germany, Israel, America, and Australia. Since 2007 she has also held the position of Conjoint Professor in the Law Faculty at the University of New South Wales, Sydney where she is a regular visitor.

She has served on the editorial boards of many journals: currently these include the Criminal Law Review, Punishment and Society, International Journal of Criminal Law Education, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, and the Oxford Comparative Law Forum.

She has been a member of the Editorial Board of the Oxford University Press monograph series Clarendon Series in Criminology since 1994 and served as General Editor of the series from 2010-12. Professor Zedner has just finished co-directing with Andrew Ashworth a three-year study of Preventive Justice generously funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, which re-assesses the foundations for the range of coercive measures that states now take in the name of crime prevention and public protection. Their co-authored monograph Preventive Justice will be published by Oxford University Press in April 2014.



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